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Latest Bird Stories

Extinct Moa Females Up To Three Times Larger Than Males
2013-04-10 13:30:01

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Sexual dimorphism, in which male and females of the same species differ significantly in appearance, is fairly common among birds. Typically, the male of the species either towers over the female or is equipped with elaborate plumage, as in the case of the peacock. However, for New Zealand´s extinct, flightless giant moa, the roles were reversed, with the female often weighing three times as much as her male suitors....

2013-04-06 23:04:19

Celebrate migration season by feeding hummingbirds, plus other fun stuff, at http://www.birdfeeders.com. Birdfeeders.com offers everything for hummingbird feeding. Lititz, PA (PRWEB) April 06, 2013 Since 1958, Perky-Pet® has been feeding hummingbirds and the annual migration season is a favorite for the brand and it´s fans. This year, they´ve decided to offer all kinds of interaction and fun for bird lovers, young and old, to help increase the excitement for bird watching,...

Nocturnal Gulls Hunting Behavior Determined By Lunar Cycle
2013-03-28 12:14:40

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Swallow-tailed gulls hunt most often under a new moon, when fish come to the surface under the cover of darkness The lunar cycle controls the behavior of various animal species: owls, swallows and bats, for example, align their activity with the phase of the moon to maximize their hunting success. However, marine life is also affected by the moon. Many species of fish hide from their enemies in the depths of the sea during the daytime and only come up to the...

Mass Extinction Of Pacific Island Birds Occurred After Arrival Of First People
2013-03-26 06:13:09

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The last region on Earth to be colonized by humans was home to more than 1,000 species of birds that went extinct shortly after people reached their island homes, new research from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and collaborators reveals. Tropical Pacific Islands, like Hawaii and Fiji, were an untouched paradise almost 4,000 years ago when the arrival of the first people caused irreversible damage with overhunting and...

Chinese Study Provides Evidence That Early Birds Had Four Wings Instead Of Two
2013-03-15 08:31:22

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When you inspect the legs of most birds you will find everything from the knee down is scaly rather than feathery. There is an exception to this rule however. Some birds of prey, such as eagles, have more feathering below the knee extending down to the feet. As for those with scaly legs, it is a remnant of their ancestry, when birds evolved from small two-legged dinosaurs millions of years ago. For the most part, experts...

2013-03-14 17:51:12

Species of seabirds could successfully return to their natural foraging habits following changes to European fisheries policies, scientists have suggested. The European Parliament recently voted to scrap the controversial discards policy, which has seen fishermen throwing thousands of edible fish and fish waste back into the sea because they have exceeded their quotas. Scientists at Plymouth University believe this could have a negative impact on some seabirds, which have become used to...

Environmental Change Impacts Differ For Male And Female Migratory Shorebirds
2013-03-11 11:17:30

University of East Anglia Extensive shell fishing and sewerage discharge in river estuaries could have serious consequences for the rare Icelandic black-tailed godwits that feed there. But it is the males that are more likely to suffer, according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the journal Ecology and Evolution reveals very different winter feeding habits between the sexes. Both males and females mainly consume bivalve molluscs, sea...

The Mysteries Of Hummingbird Flight
2013-02-26 05:40:07

[ Watch the Video: Hummingbird Hovering ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The wings of the hummingbird move so fast — about 80 beats per second — these amazing creatures can actually fly right, left, up, down, backwards and even upside down. Until now, scientists believed the bird's remarkable flight generated a single trail of vortices in its wake that helps the bird hover. A research team, led by the University of California, Riverside, conducted...

New Study Shows Low-pitched Song Of The Fairy-wren Indicates Size
2013-02-21 09:36:09

University of Melbourne The study led by University of Melbourne researcher Dr Michelle Hall, is the first to show that the larger the male fairy wren, the lower the pitch of his song. "This is the first time we have been able to show that song pitch indicates body size in song birds," said Dr Hall from the University's Department of Zoology. The study, which began when Dr Hall was at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Germany, has been published today in the journal PLOS...

Light Pollution Sparks Early Sexual Maturity For City Birds
2013-02-14 08:09:41

Enid Burns for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The light that emanates from cities may be causing birds to mate earlier. That's according to a study conducted by Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Radolfzell, Germany. The study found that nighttime light in urban areas causes birds and other animals to develop their reproductive systems earlier. In the study researchers at the Max Planck Institute studied European blackbirds (Turdus merula), to see how they develop in...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'