Quantcast

Latest Bird Stories

Robotic Swamp Sparrow Helps Understand Bird Aggression
2013-01-29 18:51:58

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study has found male sparrows actually perform a little trash talk before engaging in a brawl to the death. Researchers wrote in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology male swamp sparrows use wing waves as an aggressive signal to defend their territories and warn away intruding males. "For birds, wing waves are like flipping the bird or saying 'put up your dukes. I'm ready to fight,'" Duke University biologist...

Dinosaur Fossil Challenges Bird Evolution Theory
2013-01-25 04:10:05

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A recently discovered dinosaur fossil believed to pre-date those from which birds were believed to have evolved could drastically change current theories on the origins of flight, according to a new UK study. According to BBC News, the fossil comes from a feathered-but-flightless dinosaur that was less than a foot in length and lived approximately 140 million years ago. The creature, which has been dubbed the Eosinopteryx, would...

How To Tell If An Avian Dinosaur Was Male Or Female
2013-01-23 08:14:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of paleontologists, including Dr. Luis Chiappe, Director of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles Country's Dinosaur Institute has discovered a definitive way to determine the sex of an avian dinosaur species. The 125-million-year-old Mesozoic bird, Confuciusornis sanctus, had remarkable differences in plumage between specimens. Some had almost body length ornamental tail feathers, while others had none....

Quail Are Experts When It Comes To Camouflage
2013-01-17 13:46:03

Cell Press When it comes to camouflage, ground-nesting Japanese quail are experts. That's based on new evidence published online on January 17 in Current Biology that mother quail "know" the patterning of their own eggs and choose laying spots to hide them best. "Not only are the eggs camouflaged, but the birds choose to lay their eggs on a substrate that maximizes camouflage," said P. George Lovell of Abertay University and the University of St Andrews. "Furthermore, the maximization...

2013-01-13 17:18:07

Birdfeeders.com would like to welcome the No/No Wild Bird Feeders brand to it´s online family of leading bird feeder brands including Perky-Pet®. Lititz, PA (PRWEB) January 12, 2013 Bird enthusiasts are always searching for durable, long-lasting feeders that are worth the money, allowing them to enjoy their favorite hobby year after year. Now that Birdfeeders.com offers No/No Wild Bird Feeders enthusiasts don´t have to look as hard. No/No feeders can now be purchased by bird...

Higher Pitch Bird Songs Are Louder
2013-01-11 19:07:25

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Have you ever been to oh, let´s say, New York City or Chicago? Maybe Philadelphia or even downtown Fort Worth? If you have and you are, like me, a lover of city life and city residents, you will have noticed that the inhabitants of these cities move a little faster, have a little less patience and talk quite a bit louder. Is it the environment that drives these actions and behaviors? Does the city just attract these...

Songbirds Sing In 3D
2013-01-08 19:14:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Since both human and songbird infants learn vocal communication at an early age, the cognitive mechanisms behind bird songs have a rich history of groundbreaking research. However, an international team of scientists decided to take a deeper look into the physical mechanics behind birds´ vocalizations, according to a new study in the open access journal BMC Biology. "We know quite a bit about how the songbird brain...

Dinosaurs May Have Shaken Tail Feathers In Elaborate Mating Display
2013-01-07 14:42:34

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online This week University of Alberta researchers examining the fossilized remains of dinosaur tail bones made what appears to be a startling discovery. Our modern day birds like the turkey and the peacock, which often use their dazzling plumage to attract a mate, may be channeling their long-departed ancestors: the feathered dinosaurs. This discovery was not made in a single find, however. Scott Persons, a paleontologist at the...

Fossil Bird Discovered With Teeth For A Tough Diet
2013-01-07 11:02:26

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A trip to the Galapagos islands will bring you face to face with 14 closely related species of finch that Charles Darwin discovered on his adventure abroad in the 1830s. The finches he noted, still referenced in essentially every biology textbook, had beak sizes of varying lengths and sizes. This was true of both the ground- and tree-dwelling birds, and Darwin postulated that differing diets might have required the birds´ unique...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

More Articles (92 articles) »
Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.