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Latest Bird Stories

2012-12-02 05:02:21

Join fellow bird feeders, as they count down to the big holiday with Birdfeeders.com 25 Daily Deals of December! Litiz, PA (PRWEB) December 01, 2012 Bird feeders, young and old everywhere are celebrating the holidays with deals galore! Tweet-Tweet, Merry Christmas, Feliz Navidad, Joyeux Noel... no matter how you say it, many look forward to this very special December celebration. This year, Perky-Pet® wants to celebrate with all bird-lovers by offering a 25 Daily Deals of December...

Light Pollution: How Does It Affect Wildlife Feeding Habits?
2012-11-29 14:16:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Night-time satellite images of Earth show that every continent except Antarctica is ringed in a halo of brightly-lit human development, illustrating the fact that coasts and estuaries are among the most rapidly developing areas on the planet. Coasts are key wildlife sites as well. For example, every year millions of Arctic waterbirds arrive to winter on the UK coastlines. Scientists remain largely in the dark, however, about...

Eocene Bird Was A Giant But Peacuful Herbivore
2012-11-23 14:56:14

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When scientists first discovered fossils of the Eocene bird Diatryma in the mid 19th century, they portrayed the 7-foot avian as a fierce predator, which caught on with science writers and popular culture. However, a recent discovery has suggested that this flightless giant was a gentle herbivore and not a flesh-eating terror as previously suggested. According to a report in the journal Paleontology, a set of 50...

Evidence Links Birds And Dinosaurs
2012-11-21 21:16:27

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online More evidence has emerged, published in the journal Current Biology, claiming birds are the descendants of dinosaurs. The prehistoric Archaeopteryx and bird-like dinosaurs before them had a more primitive version of a wing, according to the recent findings. Scientists are piecing together how the wing evolved, lending to evidence that gliding dinosaurs spent much of their days in the trees. "Before, it seemed that we had...

City Birds Adjust To Their New Predators
2012-11-07 13:05:06

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology Faced with the same threat, city and country birds do not react in the same way despite being from the same species. According to a new study, urban birds have changed their anti-predator behavior in new environments. When a bird is faced with a predator, its only objective is to escape. However, city birds do not react in the same way as their countryside counterparts, despite being from the same species. Urbanization plays an...

Dinosaurs Studied To Test Cope's Rule
2012-11-03 06:05:06

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Before noted paleontologist and ichthyologist Edward Cope passed away in 1897, he had devised a theory that has, to this day, its proponents and detractors. His theory, known today as Cope´s Rule, stated that animals will, in their own voyage through the process of evolution, grow ever larger. This evolutionary trend has been noted across the animal kingdom. Researchers from the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) want to...

Evidence Found To Support Nocturnal Bottleneck Theory
2012-11-01 09:33:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most species of diurnal mammals have retained the imprint of nocturnal life in their eye structures since the age of dinosaurs. According to a new study from The University of Texas at Austin and Midwestern University, anthropoid primates - including humans, monkeys and apes - are the only groups that deviate from this pattern. This study is the first to provide a large-scale body of evidence for the "nocturnal bottleneck theory,"...

Evolutionary Family Tree Of Birds Complete
2012-11-01 08:43:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by Yale University, has created the most comprehensive family tree for birds to date. It connects all living bird species — nearly 10,000 — and reveals some surprising new details about the evolutionary history and geographic context of the birds. By analyzing the family tree, the research team was able to show when and where birds diversified. They also found that the birds' diversification rate has...

Solo Song Of Tropical Birds Regulated By Testosterone
2012-10-31 15:38:25

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Experiment in females uncovers male hormonal mechanism In male songbirds of the temperate zone, the concentration of sex hormones is rising in spring, which leads to an increase in song activity during the breeding season. In the tropics, there has been little evidence so far about such a clear relationship between hormonal action and behavior, which is partly due to a lower degree of seasonal changes of the environment. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute...

Feathered Dinosaur Fossils Discovered In North America
2012-10-26 05:01:43

[ Watch the Video: Fossils of First Feathered Dinosaurs from North America Found ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Remember the scene in the original Jurassic Park movie when the giant ostrich-like dinosaurs run from an enraged Tyrannosaurus rex? The scaly, fleet-footed animals moved like a flock of birds, gracefully wheeling across the landscape. A new study, recently published in the journal Science, reveals that this depiction of the bird-mimic dinosaurs...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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