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Latest Bird Stories

2012-07-18 12:39:38

Scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) are the first to document the characteristics of invading parasites, using malaria in New Zealand bird species. The study, published today in Ecology Letters, identifies the factors influencing the success of parasites unintentionally introduced to new environments. Avian malaria is a disease caused by species of parasites, of the genus Plasmodium, which infects birds. Just like human malaria, it is spread by mosquitoes, and the...

House Sparrows Threatened By Urban Noise
2012-07-13 10:56:05

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Man-made noise is something that will likely never go away, yet, long-term exposure to the commotions of everyday hubbub is increasing the likelihood of many health issues for us humans. But humans aside, the ever-droning din of our everyday cultures are also taking a toll on birds, particularly house sparrows. In the United Kingdom, the house sparrow population has been in decline since the 1970s, and noise pollution could be...

2012-07-12 13:14:35

It is the only dinosaur egg in the world to have an oval shape, similar to that of chicken eggs Before her death in December 2010, Nieves López Martínez, palaeontologist of the Complutense University of Madrid, was working on the research of dinosaur eggs with a very peculiar characteristic: an ovoid, asymmetrical shape. Together with Enric Vicens, palaeontologist of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the two scientists conducted an exhaustive...

2012-07-12 10:47:34

Social birds that forgo breeding to help to raise the offspring of other group members are far more likely to care for their own close relatives than for more distant kin, a new study has found. The study, which looked at a highly social species from outback Australia, the chestnut-crowned babbler, also found that these birds work much harder to care for their brothers and sisters than the young of less-related group members. The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the...

2012-07-10 06:22:10

DAVIS, Calif., July 10, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and Audubon California have released final 2012 results on the status of the rare Tricolored Blackbird, a California Bird Species of Special Concern, found in California's Central Valley. Results show the species is having a good year, thanks in large part to four farmers who have agreed to partner with the conservation agencies. Together the farmers and biologists protected 60,000...

144962871
2012-07-09 14:13:08

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Research has revealed just what is behind a birds' song, shedding more light on nature's melody. Canadian researchers found that closely related birds that share the same habitat are not necessarily birds of the same feather that flock together in music, but instead tend to look and sound different. The team studied 250 bird species throughout the world and were able to compile a database of where the birds lived, and what they...

When Do Youngsters Fly The Nest?
2012-07-06 09:45:31

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online As seabirds mature and reach a time where they can fly the nest, their parents begin to feed them less each day. However, according to researchers from the University of Leeds, it is actually hormones that control when the chicks will leave home. In their study, the researchers wanted to pinpoint the main trigger which causes chicks to leave the nest and get on to an independent life, a process known as fledging. While studying...

2012-07-04 23:02:39

Nocturnal animals can steal bird feeders, ruin gardens, attack livestock and worse. Duncraft now offers the The Nite Guard Solar, a solar powered device that deters nighttime predators with a simple principle–a flashing red light that mimics the eye of another animal. It works! Predators feel threatened and stay away! Concord, NH (PRWEB) July 03, 2012 Nocturnal animals can steal bird feeders, ruin gardens, attack livestock and worse. Duncraft now offers the The Nite Guard Solar, a...

Feathered Dinosaurs May Have Been The Norm
2012-07-03 09:47:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever discovered suggests that feathered dinosaurs were more prevalent than previously thought and could have been the norm, not the exception. The 150 million-year-old fossil found in northern Bavaria shows that the dinosaur had down-like feathers over parts of its front and back as well on its tail. Scientists dubbed the creature Sciurumimus albersdoerferi after "Scirius”, the scientific...

What Diving Seabirds Can Tell Us About Our Own Longevity
2012-07-02 08:18:41

[ Watch the Video ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Diving seabirds reach their 30s and then die swiftly and unexpectedly, showing little signs of aging prior to their death. Studying these birds could help us understand the aging process and provide critical insights for our aging citizens. Researchers studied Guillemots — which look similar to penguins but can fly — over four summers. During this time, they periodically tracked...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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