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Latest Bird Stories

Lifetime Relationship Good For Goose And Gander Shown By Black Brant Geese
2012-06-20 10:51:22

University of Nevada, Reno scientists lead decades-long Alaska studies Not all birds mate for life, but for those species that do, wildlife biologists have found a clear benefit to the birds from such long-term relationships: greater longevity and breeding success, according to a study led by University of Nevada, Reno scientists that was recently published in Behavioral Ecology. The study's authors found that when female black brant (a small arctic goose) lose their mate, their chances...

2012-06-12 23:01:39

Duncraft´s newest creations are “Rooftop” bird houses and bird feeders that have planters as roofs. Using their own plants and flowers, Duncraft customers can transform their bird feeding areas into stunning focal points and enjoy beautiful flowers along with their beautiful birds. Concord, NH (PRWEB) June 12, 2012 Duncraft's newest creations are Rooftop bird houses and bird feeders that have planters as roofs. Using their own plants and flowers, Duncraft customers can...

Osprey Chicks Hatching Live On The Internet
2012-06-07 13:16:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com Osprey chicks are pushing through their shells and into the world right now on a live camera broadcasting on the Internet. The first of three Osprey chicks have already hatched, while the second is due to hatch at any moment, according to explore.org and the National Audubon Society. The high-definition camera has been fixated on the nest since the eggs were originally laid back on April 29th. The nest is located atop a 30-foot tower at the Hog Island...

2012-06-05 23:00:39

Birds fly into windows because they see the reflection of trees and sky and think the window is open fly space. Now with CollidEscape, Duncraft customers can make the outside of their window totally opaque while the inside view remains perfectly clear to the outdoors. Concord, NH (PRWEB) June 05, 2012 Birds fly into windows because they see the reflection of trees and sky and think the window is open fly space. Now with CollidEscape, Duncraft customers can make the outside of their window...

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2012-06-02 12:15:59

Researchers at Oregon State University have created a new computer technology to listen to multiple bird sounds at one time, to identify which species are present and how they may be changing as a result of habitat loss or climate change. The system, one of the first of its type, should provide an automated approach to ecological monitoring of bird species that is much more practical than a human sitting in the field, hours on end. “It´s difficult to hear and identify even...

2012-05-23 19:27:33

Biologists Leonard Freed and Rebecca Cann from the University of Hawaii at Manoa have been studying birds at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge for 20 years. Located on an old cattle ranch on the windward slope of Mauna Kea on the Island of Hawaii, it was established in 1985 to protect 8 species of rare and endangered perching birds. The refuge and its volunteers planted over 400,000 seedlings of native koa trees in an abandoned pasture to restore high elevation forest. The once-rare...

Hitch-hikers On Birds For Life
2012-05-14 12:07:31

Although chewing lice spend their entire lives as parasites on birds, it is difficult to predict patterns of lice distribution, new research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, reveals. Researcher Daniel Gustafsson has studied chewing lice on sandpipers around the world and investigated how host birds' migration patterns affect louse distribution and relationships. With no wings and very small eyes, chewing lice are, by and large, helpless away from their host. Daniel...

2012-05-09 21:22:44

Researchers have found that bird species with multiple plumage color forms within in the same population, evolve into new species faster than those with only one color form, confirming a 60 year-old evolution theory. The global study used information from birdwatchers and geneticists accumulated over decades and was conducted by University of Melbourne scientists Dr Devi Stuart-Fox and Dr Andrew Hugall (now based at the Melbourne Museum) and is published in the journal Nature. The link...

Trackers Reveal Secrets of Cuckoo Migratory Patterns
2012-05-07 03:40:11

The first pair of five male cuckoos that were fitted with tracking devices by UK scientists last spring returned to England over the weekend, bringing with them new data about their annual migratory patterns. According to Roya Nikkhah of the Telegraph, the five birds were captured by British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) scientists in Norfolk last May, fitted with satellite-tagged units, and then released back into the wild. Their journey was then monitored as they travelled to Africa last...

Eye Size Determined By Maximum Running Speed In Mammals
2012-05-02 10:19:28

Image Credit: Photos.com ___ Maximum running speed is the most important variable influencing mammalian eye size other than body size, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. Species with larger eyes usually have higher visual acuity, says Chris Kirk, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology. But what are the ecological factors that cause some mammals to develop larger eyes than others? "If you can think of mammals that are fast like a cheetah...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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