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Latest Bird Stories

Agroforests Are Better For Birds Than Farms
2012-08-07 12:52:39

Study indicates growing coffee and cacao in shade helps birds Compared with open farmland, wooded "shade" plantations that produce coffee and chocolate promote greater bird diversity, although a new University of Utah study says forests remain the best habitat for tropical birds. The findings suggest that as open farmland replaces forests and "agroforests" — where crops are grown under trees — reduced number of bird species and shifts in the populations of various types of...

Birds In New Zealand Face Extinction
2012-08-05 19:50:05

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Keys to survival today differ from those of the past. This is revealed in a new study of nearly 300 species of New Zealand birds – from pre-human times to the present. Lead author Lindell Bromham of Australian National University said, "Taking into consideration the growing number of studies that try to predict which species could be lost in the future based on what kinds of species are considered most threatened today the...

2012-08-03 01:06:24

New research explains why female cuckoos have evolved different guises To minimize the chance of being recognized and thus attacked by the birds they are trying to parasitize, female cuckoos have evolved different guises. The new research, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, was published today, 03 August, in the journal Science. The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) lays its eggs in the nests of other birds. On hatching, the young cuckoo ejects the host's eggs and chicks...

Migrating Songbirds Depart On Time
2012-07-26 07:10:41

A new study by York University researchers finds that songbirds follow a strict annual schedule when migrating to their breeding grounds — with some birds departing on precisely the same date each year. The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is the first to track the migration routes and timing of individual songbirds over multiple years. Researchers outfitted wood thrushes with tiny geolocator "backpacks," recording data on their movements. Spring departure dates of birds...

2012-07-18 12:39:38

Scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) are the first to document the characteristics of invading parasites, using malaria in New Zealand bird species. The study, published today in Ecology Letters, identifies the factors influencing the success of parasites unintentionally introduced to new environments. Avian malaria is a disease caused by species of parasites, of the genus Plasmodium, which infects birds. Just like human malaria, it is spread by mosquitoes, and the...

House Sparrows Threatened By Urban Noise
2012-07-13 10:56:05

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Man-made noise is something that will likely never go away, yet, long-term exposure to the commotions of everyday hubbub is increasing the likelihood of many health issues for us humans. But humans aside, the ever-droning din of our everyday cultures are also taking a toll on birds, particularly house sparrows. In the United Kingdom, the house sparrow population has been in decline since the 1970s, and noise pollution could be...

2012-07-12 13:14:35

It is the only dinosaur egg in the world to have an oval shape, similar to that of chicken eggs Before her death in December 2010, Nieves López Martínez, palaeontologist of the Complutense University of Madrid, was working on the research of dinosaur eggs with a very peculiar characteristic: an ovoid, asymmetrical shape. Together with Enric Vicens, palaeontologist of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the two scientists conducted an exhaustive...

2012-07-12 10:47:34

Social birds that forgo breeding to help to raise the offspring of other group members are far more likely to care for their own close relatives than for more distant kin, a new study has found. The study, which looked at a highly social species from outback Australia, the chestnut-crowned babbler, also found that these birds work much harder to care for their brothers and sisters than the young of less-related group members. The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the...

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2012-07-09 14:13:08

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Research has revealed just what is behind a birds' song, shedding more light on nature's melody. Canadian researchers found that closely related birds that share the same habitat are not necessarily birds of the same feather that flock together in music, but instead tend to look and sound different. The team studied 250 bird species throughout the world and were able to compile a database of where the birds lived, and what they...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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