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Latest Bird Stories

Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus
2014-07-25 04:34:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers has discovered the first-ever fossils belonging to a plant-eating dinosaur that contained both scales and featherlike structures, suggesting that plumage might have been present in a far greater number of species than previously believed. The fossils were discovered in Siberia and belong to a species identified as Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus, according to Dan Vergano of National Geographic. The...

2014-07-24 23:04:17

Residents of Lindenwood, New York find themselves stuck in a messy situation with large, Federally-protected migratory birds defacing buildings. Bird-X explains how to keep these birds safe without letting them take over. Chicago, IL (PRWEB) July 24, 2014 “Who would want to repel birds?” is a question Bird-X gets a lot. Herons are nesting on buildings in Lindenwood – causing all kinds of problems for residents (New York Daily News, July 20, 2014). While herons in New York may sound...

Swainsons thrush
2014-07-23 02:00:32

University of British Columbia Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists. "Instead of taking well-trodden paths through fertile areas, these birds choose to scale mountains and cross deserts," says UBC researcher Kira Delmore. Delmore harnessed a flock of B.C. Swainson's thrushes with tiny geolocating backpacks to map their routes as they migrated south...

What Is The Mystery Behind Starling Flocks?
2014-07-22 03:30:31

University of Warwick The mystery behind the movements of flocking starlings could be explained by the areas of light and dark created as they fly, new research suggests. The research, conducted by the University of Warwick and published in the journal PNAS, found that flocking starlings aim to maintain an optimum density at which they can gather data on their surroundings. This occurs when they can see light through the flock at many angles, a state known as marginal opacity. The...

birdsong decoded
2014-07-20 09:50:04

Queen Mary, University of London Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The analysis used recordings of individual birds and of dawn choruses to identify characteristics of bird sounds. It took advantage of large datasets of sound recordings provided by the British Library Sound Archive, and online sources such as the Dutch...

California Condor
2014-07-13 04:28:23

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The California Condor is the largest wild bird in North America, with an average height of 50 inches and a wingspan around 9 feet. The Condor can live between 45 and 80 years, according to Defenders of Wildlife. The bird is listed as endangered, coming so close to extinction that in 1986 there were only 22 wild Condors left. The current population of just over 400 wild birds is due to extraordinary measures taken in 1987 when all of the...

Antarctic Adelie Penguin Populations Are Growing With New Colonies
2014-07-10 09:42:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The near-threatened Adélie penguin population has started to recover, as scientists conducting the first-ever global census of the creatures claim that the number of breeding pairs is over 50 percent higher than previously believed. Writing in the July 9 edition of The Auk: Orinthological Advances, researchers from Stony Brook University and University of Minnesota said that the number of these native Antarctic birds is 3.79...

Largest-Ever Flying Bird Was Twice The Size Of A Modern Albatross
2014-07-08 08:52:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online By studying the fossilized remains of an ancient great bird, scientists have found what is believed to be the largest flying bird ever discovered, according to research appearing in the July 7 edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. According to study author Dr. Daniel Ksepka, Curator of Science at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, the creature now known as Pelagornis sandersi likely lived 25 million...

New Discovery Reveals Insight Into Feathers, Flight Of Archaeopteryx
2014-07-04 09:52:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Long believed to be one of the first-ever birds, a new Archaeopteryx species has provided additional evidence that feathers evolved long before creatures gained the ability to fly, according to research published online Wednesday in the journal Nature. Researchers from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and the Bavarian State Collections of Paleontology and Geology in Munich, Germany found that the newest specimen of the...

2014-07-03 10:02:04

UC Davis A new pathogen has been discovered by scientists investigating major die-offs of pigeons native to North America, according to studies led by the University of California, Davis, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Scientists were able to implicate this new parasite, along with the ancient parasite Trichomonas gallinae, in the recent deaths of thousands of Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeons. The die-offs occurred during multiple epidemics in California’s...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'