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Latest Bird Stories

Study Shows Earlier Snowmelt Is Prompting Arctic Birds To Breed Earlier
2014-06-26 03:37:52

Wildlife Conservation Society WCS study shows earlier spring seasons brought about by climate change causing long-distance migrants to breed sooner A new collaborative study that included the work of Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) biologists has revealed that migratory birds that breed in Arctic Alaska are initiating nests earlier in the spring, and that snowmelt occurring earlier in the season is a big reason why. The report, "Phenological advancement in arctic bird species:...

2014-06-19 23:07:22

Turkey Vultures are in the news this week, causing problems for an airport in Nebraska. Bird-X explains why these birds are such difficult pests. (PRWEB) June 19, 2014 Reported on June 12 by Fremont Tribune, Fremont Municipal Airport in Nebraska, USA is currently experiencing a problem with turkey vultures. Bird-X, Inc., bird control experts for 50 years, explain a little more about these birds’ peculiar habits. According to the report, dozens of these large birds gather at the airport....

Birds Evolved Distinctive Patterns To Identify Cuckoo Eggs From Their Own
2014-06-19 03:13:09

University of Cambridge For some birds, recognizing their own eggs can be a matter of life or death. In a new study, scientists have shown that many birds affected by the parasitic Common Cuckoo - which lays its lethal offspring in other birds' nests - have evolved distinctive patterns on their eggs in order to distinguish them from those laid by a cuckoo cheat. The study reveals that these signature patterns provide a powerful defense against cuckoo trickery, helping host birds to...

Dinosaurs Took A Middle Road Between Warm- And Cold-Blooded
2014-06-13 09:10:26

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There has been a long-standing debate over dinosaurs: were they cold-blooded like modern day reptiles or warm-blooded like mammals? In the early days of science, and in Hollywood, these prehistoric beasts were depicted as slow, lumbering giants as they were believed to be cold-blooded. But over the past few decades, these animals have been portrayed as swift-moving lizards, more reminiscent of warm-blooded behaviors. New...

Feathers Of Migrating Birds Carry Plant Fragments To New Locations
2014-06-12 12:14:13

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online One question that biologists have is why do plants grow in the northern regions of North America and southern regions of South America, but nowhere in between? Researchers have discovered a possible explanation to why this happens. Migratory birds from the Arctic harbor fly to South America with small fragments of plants in their feathers. Over the last several decades, scientists have speculated on this idea but have gone without...

New Fossil Evidence Shows Reproductive Changes During Transition From Dinosaurs To Birds
2014-05-30 13:14:34

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Over the course of millions of years, some dinosaurs evolved into the modern birds we see today – and that transition included the shift to a single-ovary reproductive system, according to a new report in the National Science Review journal. The study authors said this change was probably advantageous to flying animals that evolved toward lighter and lighter weights. "The most widely accepted hypothesis for the presence of a...

New Birdsnap App Will Tell You If It Is A Crow Or Raven
2014-05-28 03:13:00

[ Watch The Video: Birdsnap: A Digital Field Guide ] By Holly Evarts, Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science Columbia Engineering researchers use computer vision + machine learning techniques to launch electronic field guide featuring 500 of the most common North American bird species Researchers at Columbia Engineering, led by Computer Science Professor Peter Belhumeur, have taken bird-watching to a new level. Using computer vision and machine learning...

Less Diversity Found In Bird Species Of 125M Years Ago
2014-05-28 11:10:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While the typical American wetland hosts a range of birds with different physiologies and behaviors, bird diversity in prehistoric times was significantly lower, according to a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. "There were no swans, no swallows, no herons, nothing like that. They were pretty much all between a sparrow and a crow," said study author Jonathan Mitchell, an evolutionary biologist at the...

Aussie's Can No Longer Claim The Kiwi's Origins
2014-05-23 11:52:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New Zealand’s iconic kiwi is not related to Australia’s emu, but instead is derived from the extinct Madagascan elephant bird, according to a new study in the journal Science. The study also concluded that both of these flightless birds were once able to take to the air. With the kiwi being about the size of a chicken and the Madagascan elephant bird standing around 6 to 9 feet tall – the two make for a bit of an evolutionary...

2014-05-20 23:01:50

Guests can buy nectar cups and hand-feed the lorikeets in walk-through aviary, open May 24-Sept. 1. A memorable 'Get-Close' experience. Norwalk, CT (PRWEB) May 20, 2014 Step into a lush aviary to share a laugh and a squawk with beautiful tropical birds that will sip food right out of your hands as “Lorikeets” returns as the special summer exhibit at The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk. “Lorikeets” will be open from May 24 through Sept. 1 outside on the Aquarium’s riverfront...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'