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Latest Bird Stories

European Robin
2014-05-09 08:58:07

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Electromagnetic noise from AM broadcast signals (or "electrosmog") could be interfering with the migratory flight paths of birds by disrupting the animals' "internal compass,” German researchers reported this week in the journal Nature. "At first, I was highly skeptical that this could be the explanation. But if you have seemingly unlikely effects then the proof needs to be much stronger - and that is why we have done so many...

2014-05-07 10:50:42

The sight of seabirds following trawlers in order to feast from discarded fish is a common maritime sight, but each year many thousands of seabirds are killed by overhanging cables or in nets. New research in Animal Conservation assesses mortality figures from South Africa to show that a simple bird scaring line can reduce the mortality rate by over 90%. The research compiled data from five years of observations to compare current and historic mortality rates. Previous research shows that...

Evolution Of Smaller Dinosaurs Helped Their Lineage Survive As Birds
2014-05-07 09:53:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While dinosaurs may have disappeared from the face of the Earth, their lineage has survived in the form of birds and new research published in the journal PLOS Biology has found that both dinosaurs and birds evolved into smaller and smaller sizes – potentially contributing to their success. “Dinosaurs aren't extinct; there are about 10,000 species alive today in the form of birds,” said study author Roger Benson, a paleobiologist...

Saving Endangered Birds By Giving Them Treated Cotton For Nests
2014-05-06 03:06:47

University of Utah When University of Utah biologists set out cotton balls treated with a mild pesticide, wild finches in the Galapagos Islands used the cotton to help build their nests, killing parasitic fly maggots to protect baby birds. The researchers say the self-fumigation method may help endangered birds and even some mammals. "We are trying to help birds help themselves," says biology professor Dale Clayton, senior author of a study outlining the new technique. The findings were...

2014-04-28 23:02:33

On April 13, 2014, Ian Rowsby, Director of Sales at Bird-B-Gone, embarked on a 2,650 mile trek across the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). “Since I first read about the trail ten years ago I’ve wanted to hike the PCT, and now seems like the perfect time,” says Rowsby. Irvine, California (PRWEB) April 28, 2014 Rowsby’s life has been full of adventure to this point. Born and raised in the U.K. where he raced motorbikes professionally until the age of 27. He then decided to take a new path...

Birds Accept And Raise Brood Parasites’ Young For Fear Of Retaliation
2014-04-18 14:50:57

Max Planck Institute If a restaurant owner fails to pay the protection money demanded of him, he can expect his premises to be trashed. Warnings like these are seldom required, however, as fear of the consequences is enough to make restaurant owners pay up. Similarly, mafia-like behavior is observed in parasitic birds, which lay their eggs in other birds’ nests. If the host birds throw the cuckoo’s egg out, the brood parasites take their revenge by destroying the entire nest....

Wildlife Conservation Society Study Shows Iconic Boreal Bird Species Declining In The Adirondacks
2014-04-14 11:30:41

Wildlife Conservation Society A new study from the Wildlife Conservation Society finds that several iconic Adirondack birds are in trouble, with declines driven by the size of their wetland habitats, how connected these wetlands are to one another, and how near they are to human infrastructure. The Adirondack Park represents the southern range extent for several species of boreal forest birds in eastern North America. Like any species at the edge of its range, they face challenges in...

2014-04-10 23:01:44

Bird-B-Gone, Inc., offers tips on how to how to determine when and which bird control products are needed. To learn more about humane bird control solutions and Bird-B-Gone’s Authorized Installers, visit us online at http://www.birdbgone.com. Irvine, CA (PRWEB) April 10, 2014 Tip # 1: Identify the Pest Bird All bird problems are not the same. The first step in determining the bird control solution to use is to identify the type of pest bird that is creating a problem. There are...

2014-04-10 12:25:38

PHILADELPHIA, April 10, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Travel to New Guinea this spring and follow a real-life adventure to discover exotic birds-of-paradise, an elegant example of extreme evolution, in the highly interactive exhibit Birds of Paradise: Amazing Avian Evolution, at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. Found only in New Guinea and parts of Australia, birds-of-paradise are known for their ornate feathers and tail plumes and elaborate mating rituals that...

2014-04-04 23:02:39

When it comes to barn swallows, prevention is key to keeping mud nests and droppings from spreading all over buildings. Bird-X explains how to prepare now to save the headaches later. Chicago, IL (PRWEB) April 04, 2014 Swallows build their nests exclusively on man-made structures and everyone has seen them – mud nests under bridges, behind roof overhangs, and of course in barns. As the long winter finally clears, these little birds are actively migrating north by the millions at this...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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