Quantcast

Latest Bird Stories

Evolution Of Species Does Not Always Follow Darwin's Theories
2013-12-23 04:19:44

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Evolutionary scientists have long argued that species that live together must evolve in different ways in order to avoid direct competition with each other, but new research published Sunday in the journal Nature suggests otherwise. A team of researchers led by Dr. Joe Tobias of Oxford University's Department of Zoology studied ovenbirds, one of the most diverse families of birds in the world, in order to conduct an in-depth...

Detailing The Evolution Of Plumage Patterns In Male, Female Birds
2013-12-19 14:06:31

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Waterfowl such as ducks, geese and swans belong to the order Anseriformes. Game birds such as pheasants, partridges, hens and turkeys are known as the order Galliformes. The birds belonging to both of these orders are recognized not only for their meat, but also for the elegant display of their plumage. Some members within the orders show differences between male and female, known as sexual dimorphism. Such as with the mallard, the...

Giant Moa Not So Giant
2013-12-19 14:20:21

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study of the extinct giant moa has found the massive flightless birds were actually less robust than previously believed. In the study, which was published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers conducted computer tomography (CT) scans of full giant moa skeletons to create comprehensive digital images which were used to determine the birds' mass and general constitution. The team also scanned a smaller moa species called Pachyornis...

Tree Sparrows Recognize Foreign Eggs In Their Nest By Color And Shape
2013-12-11 09:23:39

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Many birds have reason to worry that the eggs in their nest might not be their own: birds often deposit eggs into other nests and it is not easy for parents to tell their eggs from others. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have discovered that tree sparrows can recognize eggs deposited by other tree sparrows but do not always reject them. The results are published in the online journal Plos One. Building a nest, laying...

2013-12-10 23:01:10

Bird-B-Gone Inc. announces the release of their new commercial installation videos in Spanish. The videos cover installation of Bird Wire, Bird Spike, Bird Slope™ and Bird Jolt Flat Track™ and are now available on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/user/birdbgone. Irvine, CA (PRWEB) December 10, 2013 Each video provides an informative overview of how to install bird control products. “We are now able to reach and help a wider range of customers as many of them speak Spanish. Just...

Sparrows Display Personalities During Fights
2013-12-04 08:52:17

University of Washington Like humans, some song sparrows are more effusive than others, at least when it comes to defending their territories. New findings from the University of Washington show that consistent individual differences exist not only for how aggressive individual song sparrows are but also for how much they use their signals to communicate their aggressive intentions. The findings, published online Dec. 4 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show that while many birds...

Beaks Were Functionally Important In Protecting Dinosaur Skulls
2013-12-03 08:20:52

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One typical hallmark of modern birds that comes in a huge variety of shapes and sizes is the beak. While this is common knowledge, it is less well known that during the Cretaceous Period keratin-covered beaks had already evolved in different groups of dinosaurs. A international team of scientists, composed of Dr Stephan Lautenschlager and Dr Emily Rayfield of the University of Bristol with Dr Perle Altangerel of the National...

Just In Time For Thanksgiving Comes Turkey Science: Exclusive
2013-11-27 14:55:11

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Each Thanksgiving, 46 million turkeys are consumed by 88 percent of Americans, but what do we actually know about the bird that graces our table each year? redOrbit has dug up some facts about the delectable birds to help throw a little knowledge down at the dinner table this year to impress the in-laws. The National Bird As most everyone knows, the Bald Eagle is America’s national bird. However, Benjamin Franklin had a poor...

New Species Arise Faster In Temperate Regions Than In The Tropics
2013-11-23 05:39:01

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Biodiversity tends to be higher in the tropics, and new research appearing in the journal Molecular Ecology has an explanation as to why that region of the world is home to so many different types of plants and animals. As part of their study, North Carolina State University geneticist Carlos Botero and his colleagues reviewed 2,300 species of mammals and 6,700 species of birds from all over the world. They found that, even though...

2013-11-20 23:01:53

Absolute Bird Control now offers an effective and humane solution to keeping pest birds off boats, AC units, signs, rooftops and marinas. The Repeller 360° is a wind-powered device that literally sweeps bird pests away—without harming them. Irvine, California (PRWEB) November 20, 2013 The Repeller 360° spins in the wind to prevent large birds such as gulls, pigeons and crows from landing in unwanted areas. The unit offers pest bird protection in a 6-foot diameter, keeping...


Latest Bird Reference Libraries

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Cathartes burrovianus
2013-04-23 15:11:08

The Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus), also known as the Savannah Vulture, is a species of bird belonging to the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Greater Yellow-headed Vulture until they were separated in 1964. It can be found in Mexico, Central America, and South America in seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, heavily degraded former forests and swamps. It’s a large bird, with a wingspan of 59 to 65 inches. The...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

More Articles (92 articles) »
Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
Related