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Latest Birds of North America Stories

11730f6f68b7a5e368cc9056619442be
2011-08-11 08:31:17

While singing the same songs as your neighbors may sound harmonious, research conducted at Queen's University Biological Station (QUBS) suggests that song-sharing amongst song sparrow populations is actually an aggressive behavior, akin to flinging insults back and forth. "It's been hypothesized that repertoire size and song complexity is about the singer's ability to advertise their quality as a mate," says lead author Janet Lapierre, a visiting biologist from the University of Western...

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2011-07-20 12:23:50

In a case of life imitating art, avian scents given off by male songbirds have the females (and males) flocking in. A Michigan State University researcher revealed the process of how males draw attention to themselves through chemical communication in the current issue of Behavioral Ecology. Scents are used in all organisms for many purposes, such as finding, attracting and evaluating mates. But this is the first study of its kind that demonstrates that it is happening among songbirds, said...

2011-07-12 15:08:00

Rescued baby falcon presents naming opportunity for kids at U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital ANN ARBOR, Mich., July 12, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A two-month-old peregrine falcon chick was recently reunited with her parents in their nest on the roof of University Hospital at the University of Michigan Health System. She had been in the care of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources after she attempted to fly and was unable to get back up to the nest. The young falcon is one...

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2011-06-25 07:47:30

Some birds use information gathered from eavesdropping on their enemies to find safer areas to build their nests, scientists have found. Birds that nest on the ground, such as ovenbirds and veeries, fall prey to predators as many eggs and fledglings struggle to survive. Neighboring chipmunks are a major threat. These birds use a range of cues to determine the location of their nests, but Quinn Emmering and Dr. Kenneth Schmidt from Texas Tech University suggest that the "chips," "chucks" and...

2011-06-21 09:00:00

MONROE, Mich., June 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- DTE Energy's (NYSE: DTE) Monroe Power Plant and Fermi 2 Nuclear Plant have four new residents: bald eagle chicks. And the company needs your help to name these iconic American symbols just in time for the Fourth of July. Starting today, you can visit DTE Energy's Facebook page -- Facebook.com/dteenergy -- to suggest names for the eaglets. There are two male eaglets at the Monroe Power Plant, and two eaglets at Fermi 2 that are too young to...

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2011-06-15 13:40:37

Birds with high levels of stress hormones have the highest mating success and offer better parental care to their brood, according to new biology research at Queen's University. "Having high levels of glucocorticoid or stress hormone is often thought to indicate an individual in poor condition who has a low level of mating success. However, our research indicates that tree swallows with the highest levels of stress hormone have the highest reproductive success," says Frances Bonier (Biology)...


Latest Birds of North America Reference Libraries

Sharp Tailed Grouse, Tympanuchus phasianellus
2013-10-07 11:50:53

The Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) is a prairie grouse of medium size. It has also known as the sharptail, and is known as “fire grouse” or “fire bird” by Native American Indians because of their reliance on brush fires to keep their habitat open. Six extant and one extinct subspecies of Sharp-tailed Grouse have been described. This grouse along with the Greater Prairie-chicken and the Lesser Prairie-chicken make up the genus Tympanuchus, which is a genus of grouse...

Hooded Crane, Grus monacha
2013-04-24 12:13:58

The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) is a small, dark colored crane. Its body is grey and the top of the head and neck is white, except for a patch of bare red skin above they eye. It’s one of the smallest cranes, but is still a fairly large bird, a 3.3 ft in length, weighing 8.2 pounds and a wingspan of 6.2 feet. It breeds in south-central and southeastern Siberia. Breeding is also assumed to occur in Mongolia. Over 80% of its population winters at Izumi, southern Japan. There are also...

Gunnison Grouse, Centrocercus minimus
2013-04-23 23:18:44

The Gunnison Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is a species of grouse endemic to the United States, where it is known as the Gunnison Sage-Grouse. It’s similar to the closely related Greater Sage-Grouse in its appearance but about a third smaller in size, with much thicker plumes behind its head; it also has a less complex courtship dance. It’s restricted in range to southwestern Colorado and extreme southeastern Utah, with the largest population residing in the Gunnison Basin region in...

Masked Duck, Nomonyx dominicus
2013-04-23 13:09:51

The Masked Duck (Nomonyx dominicus) is a small stiff-tailed duck ranging through the tropical Americas. They’re found from Mexico to South America and also in the Caribbean. They are primarily non-migratory. Masked Ducks are reported as very uncommon vagrants in the southernmost part of the United States, along the Mexican border and in Florida. Being the only member of the genus Nomonyx, it’s intermediate between the rather primitive Black-headed Duck (Heteronetta) and the very...

White-headed Duck, Oxyura leucocephala
2013-04-22 14:37:37

The White-headed Duck (Oxyura leucocephala) is a petite stiff-tailed duck. The adult males have a reddish and grey body, a blue bill, and a largely white head with black cap and neck. The adult females have a brown-grey body with a white face and a darker bill, cheek stripe and cap. On average, its length is 17 to 19 inches and the weight is 1.3 to 1.7 lbs. This duck breeds in Spain and North Africa, with a bigger population in western and central Asia. Their breeding habitat is large...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.