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Latest Birds of North America Stories

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2011-06-15 13:40:37

Birds with high levels of stress hormones have the highest mating success and offer better parental care to their brood, according to new biology research at Queen's University. "Having high levels of glucocorticoid or stress hormone is often thought to indicate an individual in poor condition who has a low level of mating success. However, our research indicates that tree swallows with the highest levels of stress hormone have the highest reproductive success," says Frances Bonier (Biology)...

2011-05-17 12:57:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., May 17, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Department of Environmental Protection and Game Commission today hosted a Peregrine falcon banding event to help students learn about efforts to restore the species. "Public interest in the resurgence of Peregrine falcons continues to grow," DEP Secretary Mike Krancer said. "With a coded identification band, wildlife officials and enthusiasts everywhere will be able to use our website to monitor the falcon's activities and...

2011-05-10 05:00:00

PLANO, Texas, May 10, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- ViewCast Corporation (OTCBB: VCST), a developer of industry-leading solutions for the transformation, management and delivery of digital media over enterprise, broadband, and mobile networks, today announced that the University of Montreal has deployed a donated ViewCast Osprey® 440 video capture card and SimulStream® software to aid in the 24/7, live monitoring of a family of peregrine falcons that reside on...

2011-04-21 08:01:00

Display case and frame available for five-year series HARRISBURG, Pa., April 21, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The fifth and final year of the Pennsylvania Game Commission's two time-limited collectible series - the Wild Turkey Heritage Series and the Upland Game Bird Series - now are available for ordering. Limited to the first 1,000 orders, which will be delivered between October and December, those interested should place orders through the agency's website (www.pgc.state.pa.us), or...

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2011-03-31 08:31:15

Instinct and the annual increase of daylight hours have long been thought to be the triggers for birds to begin their spring migration. Scientists at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, however, have found that that may not be the case. Researchers have focused on how warming trends in temperate breeding areas disrupt the sensitive ecology of migratory birds. This new research shows that changes in rainfall on the tropical wintering grounds could be equally disruptive. The team's...

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2011-03-22 08:38:07

The Tuamotu Kingfisher is a multicolored, tropical bird with bright blue feathers, a dusty orange head, and a bright green back. The entire population of these birds "“ less than 125 "“ lives on one tiny island in the south Pacific, and without serious intervention, they will no longer exist. One University of Missouri researcher is trying to stop the birds' extinction by working with farmers and residents on the island inhabited by the kingfishers. "If we lose these birds, we...

2011-03-10 23:28:16

A new study by scientists from Maryland and Colorado using American kestrels, a surrogate test species for raptorial birds, suggests that they are at greater risk from poisoning from the rodenticide diphacinone than previous believed. The research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, considers the threat posed by diphacinone as its usage increases following restrictions on the use of similar pesticides. "Recent restrictions on the use of some rodenticides may result in...

2011-02-18 23:01:00

WASHINGTON, Feb. 19, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Following is the daily "Profile America" feature from the U.S. Census Bureau: (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/CENSUSLOGO) SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19: AN ANNUAL BIRD CENSUS Profile America -- Saturday, February 19th. It turns out that February is literally for the birds. First, this is National Bird Feeding month, with the goal of helping birds through the worst part of the winter by supplementing their natural food,...

2010-09-20 10:37:24

Patterned feathers, previously thought to be used only for camouflage in birds, can play an important role in attracting a mate and fending off rivals, a University of Melbourne study reveals. Ms Thanh-Lan Gluckman, co-author of the paper and Masters of Philosophy student from the Department of Zoology at the University of Melbourne, said this finding brought a new perspective to research in animal communication and evolution. "The implication of this study is that feathers don't need to be...

2010-06-25 08:35:00

State threatened species continues its ascent By Joe Kosack, Wildlife Conservation Education Specialist, Pennsylvania Game Commission HARRISBURG, Pa., June 25 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The bald eagle's amazing recovery from the brink of extinction in this state continues at a heartwarming pace as America prepares to celebrate the birth of its independence, according to the Pennsylvania Game Commission. So far this year, 192 bald eagle nests - in 50 counties - have been recorded in...


Latest Birds of North America Reference Libraries

Sharp Tailed Grouse, Tympanuchus phasianellus
2013-10-07 11:50:53

The Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) is a prairie grouse of medium size. It has also known as the sharptail, and is known as “fire grouse” or “fire bird” by Native American Indians because of their reliance on brush fires to keep their habitat open. Six extant and one extinct subspecies of Sharp-tailed Grouse have been described. This grouse along with the Greater Prairie-chicken and the Lesser Prairie-chicken make up the genus Tympanuchus, which is a genus of grouse...

Hooded Crane, Grus monacha
2013-04-24 12:13:58

The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) is a small, dark colored crane. Its body is grey and the top of the head and neck is white, except for a patch of bare red skin above they eye. It’s one of the smallest cranes, but is still a fairly large bird, a 3.3 ft in length, weighing 8.2 pounds and a wingspan of 6.2 feet. It breeds in south-central and southeastern Siberia. Breeding is also assumed to occur in Mongolia. Over 80% of its population winters at Izumi, southern Japan. There are also...

Gunnison Grouse, Centrocercus minimus
2013-04-23 23:18:44

The Gunnison Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is a species of grouse endemic to the United States, where it is known as the Gunnison Sage-Grouse. It’s similar to the closely related Greater Sage-Grouse in its appearance but about a third smaller in size, with much thicker plumes behind its head; it also has a less complex courtship dance. It’s restricted in range to southwestern Colorado and extreme southeastern Utah, with the largest population residing in the Gunnison Basin region in...

Masked Duck, Nomonyx dominicus
2013-04-23 13:09:51

The Masked Duck (Nomonyx dominicus) is a small stiff-tailed duck ranging through the tropical Americas. They’re found from Mexico to South America and also in the Caribbean. They are primarily non-migratory. Masked Ducks are reported as very uncommon vagrants in the southernmost part of the United States, along the Mexican border and in Florida. Being the only member of the genus Nomonyx, it’s intermediate between the rather primitive Black-headed Duck (Heteronetta) and the very...

White-headed Duck, Oxyura leucocephala
2013-04-22 14:37:37

The White-headed Duck (Oxyura leucocephala) is a petite stiff-tailed duck. The adult males have a reddish and grey body, a blue bill, and a largely white head with black cap and neck. The adult females have a brown-grey body with a white face and a darker bill, cheek stripe and cap. On average, its length is 17 to 19 inches and the weight is 1.3 to 1.7 lbs. This duck breeds in Spain and North Africa, with a bigger population in western and central Asia. Their breeding habitat is large...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'