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Latest birth defects Stories

2008-07-22 06:00:45

By Mary Brophy Marcus Pregnant women who take the epilepsy drug topiramate may increase their newborn's risk of birth defects, especially if they combine the drug with other epilepsy medications, according to a small study in this week's Neurology. Scientists who evaluated 203 women who became pregnant while taking topiramate, generic for Topamax, reported that of 178 babies born, 16 had major birth defects, including cleft palate and other malformations. Three of the 16 babies born...

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2008-05-25 09:10:00

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- When Barbora Bell wanted to have kids, she ditched the birth control pills, popped prenatal vitamins, and got more iron and calcium. Her husband's pre-conception regimen was much easier: "He had a glass of wine," Bell said, laughing. The Los Gatos, Calif., couple didn't hear a single dietary suggestion to help prospective fathers have healthy kids. If they had, Bell said, "we would have been doing it." Women contribute just half their children's genes. Yet would-be...

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2008-03-21 01:55:00

Researchers at University of California, Berkeley, report that men with low levels of folate are at an increased risk for sperm containing too many or too few chromosomes, which can cause birth defects and miscarriages.  The research is the first study to find a link between diet and sperm health. While the benefits of folate for women in preventing birth defects are widely known, the Berkeley research suggests it also boosts sperm health. In fact, the research found that folate...

2006-03-17 13:24:49

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who take decongestants during pregnancy don't appear to risk having poor outcomes or to be putting their baby at risk for birth defects, a Swedish team reports. A runny nose during pregnancy -- so-called pregnancy rhinitis -- "is a rather common complaint." Dr. Bengt A. J. Kallen, of the University of Lund, and colleagues write in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. There has been some concern that treating the problem with...

2006-03-08 12:39:53

By Will Boggs, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Birth defects appear to be uncommon in infants born to women infected with West Nile virus (WNV) during pregnancy, according to a new report. "The current study's findings are overall reassuring in that the majority of the women for whom there was information delivered apparently healthy infants with normal growth and development," Dr. Daniel R. O'Leary from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado told Reuters...

2006-01-30 16:50:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Nearly 8 million children are born with birth defects around the world every year and most of them either die or are disabled for life as a result, according to a report released on Monday. With proper medical care up to 70 percent of these defects could be prevented, or at least treated, the report from the March of Dimes said. "An estimated 7.9 million children are born annually with a serious birth defect of genetic or...

2005-11-21 16:07:51

GAINESVILLE, Fla. - Twins, triplets and other multiples have a nearly 50 percent greater chance of being born with birth defects, and boys tend to be more at risk than girls, according to two population-based studies conducted at the University of Florida. UF researchers who studied all Florida births from 1996 through 2000 found multiples have a higher risk than babies born singly of developing 23 of 40 birth defects, such as spina bifida, according to results recently published online in...

2005-10-04 14:34:46

BOSTON "“ The babies of women with diabetes are two to five times more likely to develop birth defects than offspring of women without the disease. A recent study in animals by scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston helps explain why. The research, appearing in the October issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism, suggests that high blood glucose levels early in pregnancy deprive the embryo of oxygen, interfering with its development. "Until...

2005-09-07 10:49:59

But March of Dimes calls for increase in food fortification levels Folic acid fortification of foods, mandated since 1998 in the United States, continues to help reduce the incidence of severe birth defects such as spina bifida, researchers report. The study, which appears in the September issue of Pediatrics, included a look at the effects of the B vitamin on children born to black and Hispanic women. "We wanted to see if all racial and ethnic groups are having decreases, or is it only, for...

2005-07-19 14:57:40

GAINESVILLE, Fla. - University of Florida researchers have learned how to selectively shut down a flyweight-sized genetic molecule that packs a heavyweight punch, a discovery that may help doctors better understand cancer, birth defects and other health problems. The finding, which will be reported this week in the online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, deals with tiny strands of genetic material called microRNAs. Once thought to be little more than cellular debris, these...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.