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Latest Bivalves Stories

2008-06-24 06:02:37

By Steven Kalas He's not in love anymore. When he says it, I think of Dorothy holding her scruffy dog and saying, "I don't think we're in Kansas anymore, Toto." He's dismayed. A little awed. Eyes wide. Unsure. But relieved. Ever so relieved. And maybe a little anxious, too, like, if he surrenders to the relief and enjoys it, then perhaps he'll relapse into heartsickness once again. I'm not Jewish, but still I pantomime raising a glass of wine and I say, "Mazel tov!" Almost three years...

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2008-06-04 12:00:00

Central California lakes and waterways are being threatened by tiny mollusk invaders that pose as hitchhikers. Because quagga and zebra mussels are spread primarily through human-related activities, the Department of Fish and Game is asking for cooperation from boaters to prevent these destructive species from gaining a foothold in the San Joaquin Valley. Many other areas of the state have been on high alert since last fall, when quagga mussels were discovered in numerous places along the...

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2007-12-31 18:00:00

LAKE WORTH, Fla. - A Florida man was about halfway through a plate of steamed clams when he chomped down on something hard - a rare, iridescent purple pearl. George Brock and his wife, Leslie, had been spending a day at the beach Friday in South Florida and stopped at Dave's Last Resort & Raw Bar for a bite. Their find could be worth thousands. "Few are round and few are a lovely color, so this is rare," said gemologist Antoinette Matlins. "I think they have found something precious and...

2007-10-28 15:00:15

By Erin Fuchs, Chattanooga Times/Free Press, Tenn. Oct. 28--DALTON, Ga. -- During a summer survey of freshwater mussels, conservationist Nate Thomas saw the mollusks struggling to find enough water in the Conasauga River to thrive. "You could literally see the trails the shells made (in the mud) as they moved up and down the bank, looking for water," said Mr. Thomas, who runs The Nature Conservancy's North Georgia operation. "Some of them made it. Some of them didn't." The Conasauga...

2007-10-18 09:00:16

By SETH BORENSTEIN By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press In one of the earliest hints of "modern" living, humans 164,000 years ago put on primitive makeup and hit the seashore for steaming mussels, new archaeological finds show. Call it a beach party for early man. But it's a beach party thrown by people who weren't supposed to be advanced enough for this type of behavior. What was found in a cave in South Africa may change how scientists believe Homo sapiens marched into...

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2007-03-29 15:35:00

WASHINGTON -- Overfishing of powerful sharks - a top predator in the ocean - may endanger bay scallops, a gourmet delicacy. With fewer sharks to devour them, skates and rays have increased sharply along the East Coast and they are gobbling up shellfish, particularly bay scallops, researchers report in Friday's issue of the journal Science. Ecologists have known that reducing key species on land can affect an entire ecosystem, but this study provides hard data for the same thing in the ocean,...

2006-08-11 16:24:48

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. health officials added a warning about clams on Friday to their caution against eating raw oysters from the Pacific Northwest following more reports of stomach sickness caused by bacteria from the shellfish. Seventy-two illnesses linked to contaminated oysters and clams were reported from May 20 through July 31, the Food and Drug Administration said. Another 105 probable cases were recorded during the same time period. The illnesses were reported in...

2006-07-31 14:09:58

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Consumers should avoid eating raw oysters harvested from the Pacific Northwest, U.S. health officials warned on Monday after reports of stomach illnesses linked to bacterial contamination. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said a growing number of people, mostly in Washington state, have reported getting sick after eating oysters tainted with the Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacterium. More than 70 people in Washington have been infected, according to the...

2006-07-31 14:26:07

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Consumers should avoid eating raw oysters harvested from the Pacific Northwest, U.S. health officials warned on Monday after reports of stomach illnesses linked to bacterial contamination. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said a growing number of people, mostly in Washington state, have reported getting sick after eating oysters tainted with the Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacterium. More than 70 people in Washington have been infected, according to the...

2006-01-24 20:59:41

By Lucas van Grinsven AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Blue-collar workers in Europe and the United States who feel threatened by Asian rivals should spare a thought for local birds, crabs and oysters, also facing competition from more efficient eastern species. Dull-colored pigeons, starlings and crows used to dominate the skies above Amsterdam, but these days citizens might spot the brilliant green plumage of a long-tailed tropical parakeet. Originally from Asia, 1,200 collar parakeets now...


Latest Bivalves Reference Libraries

Chinese Pond Mussel, Sinanodonta woodiana
2013-10-11 11:20:39

The Chinese Pond Mussel (Sinanodonta woodiana), known also as the Eastern Asiatic Freshwater Clam or the Swan-mussel, is a species of freshwater mussel, an aquatic bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Uniondale, the river mussels. The shell is brown or blackish, occasionally with a greenish hue, the color varying but normally more intensively colored at the periphery. The shape is elliptical to almost spherical, with the lower margin strongly convex. It is native to Eastern Asia but...

Corbicula fluminea
2013-10-11 11:17:31

Corbicula fluminea is a species of freshwater clam, an aquatic bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Corbiculidae. This species is originally from Asian origin, therefore it is often referred to as the Asian Clam or Asiatic Clam. Within the aquarium and koi pond trade it is frequently called the Golden Clam or Golden Freshwater Clam. Within southeast Asia its known as the Prosperity Clam or the Good Luck Clam. It has been introduced into many parts of the world such as North America...

Pinctada Maxima
2013-04-25 16:49:52

Pinctada maxima is a species of pearl oyster, a marine bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Pteriidae, the pearl oysters. There are two different color varieties: the White lipped oyster and the Gold lipped oyster. These bivalves are considered to be the largest pearl oysters in the world. They have a very strong inner shell layer composed of nacre, also known as “mother of pearl”. They’re significant in the cultured pearl industry as they are used to produce South Sea pearls....

Flat Tree Oyster, Isognomon alatus
2013-04-25 16:28:02

The Flat Tree Oyster, Isognomon alatus, is a species of bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Isognomonidae. It can be seen along the Atlantic coast of North America, ranging from southern Florida to Brazil and Bermuda. This oyster has two thin and irregularly shaped valves that are joined by a long straight hinge. The exterior is sculpted by a large number of rough, concentric rings with loose flakes and varies in color from a pale brownish olive to a purplish black. The nacre on the...

Cockscomb Oyster, Lopha cristagalli
2013-04-17 11:50:41

Lopha cristagalli, also known as cockscomb oyster, is a species of marine bivalve mollusks within the family Ostreidae. This species has a shell with the potential to reach a maximum diameter of roughly 20.5 centimeters, 10 centimeters being the most common. The coloration varies from dark to light purple and is thick, strongly ribbed, and slightly inequitable shell. The shell inside is porcelaneous, normally a purplish-brown or whitish. The margins of the valves have a distinctive zig-zag...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.