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Latest Bivalves Stories

2011-01-22 08:50:52

Study measures oysters' capacity to filter ag and urban runoff in the Chesapeake Bay Chronic water quality problems caused by agricultural and urban runoff, municipal wastewater, and atmospheric deposition from the burning of fossil fuels leads to oxygen depletion, loss of biodiversity, and harmful algal blooms. This nutrient pollution is prevalent in many coastal marine and estuarine ecosystems worldwide. Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in North America and although many efforts have...

2010-11-30 21:58:59

Scientists working with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary and The Academy of Natural Sciences have made an important discovery in the Delaware River between Chester, Pennsylvania, and Trenton, New Jersey: beds of freshwater mussels. This includes several uncommon species, two of which were previously believed to no longer exist in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. "Freshwater mussels are very sensitive to a variety of problems, including pollution, dams, water flows, loss of forests,...

2010-11-22 12:30:11

A new oyster farming initiative has launched in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The goal of this effort, a collaboration between researchers from LSU and Auburn University, is industry adoption of off-bottom oyster culture to supplement the traditional harvest. Historically, oysters are grown on and harvested from reefs on the water bottom. In this new process, oysters are grown suspended in the water column. Benefits of this new oyster farming technique include increased productivity; job...

2010-09-15 14:33:00

MOBILE, Ala., Sept. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- A coalition of leading environmental organizations has unveiled plans for a major Gulf restoration project with the launch of 100-1000: Restore Coastal Alabama Partnership (www.100-1000.org). Alabama Coastal Foundation, Mobile Baykeeper, The Nature Conservancy and The Ocean Foundation officially launched the project as a significant first step in restoring the coast of Alabama and struggling coastal economies via a public-private partnership....

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2010-08-24 12:40:00

Chemists discover how oysters bond together to form massive reef complexes Oyster reefs are on the decline, with over-harvesting and pollution reducing some stocks as much as 98 percent over the last two centuries. With a growing awareness of oysters' critical roles filtering water, preventing erosion, guarding coasts from storm damage, and providing habitat for other organisms, researchers have been investigating how oyster reefs form in order to better understand the organisms and offer...

2010-08-16 18:08:56

Climate change is causing higher air and water temperatures along the east coast of the United States. These changes have shrunk the geographic region where blue mussels are able to survive, according to findings by University of South Carolina researchers published in the Journal of Biogeography. Mytilus edulis, or blue mussels, a popular seafood, used to live along the East Coast as far south as Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, but now exist only as far south as Lewes, Delaware, according to...

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2010-08-06 12:15:00

It has been widely reported that the build up of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air, which is caused by human behavior, will likely lead to climate change and have major implications for life on earth. But less focus has been given to global warming's evil twin, ocean acidification, which occurs when CO2 lowers the pH of water bodies, thus making them more acidic. This lesser known phenomenon may have catastrophic effects on all sea life.Oysters in PerilInna Sokolova, associate professor of...

2010-07-08 14:08:04

The rapid growth of the oyster aquaculture industry in Rhode Island has raised questions about how many oyster farms Narragansett Bay and the state's salt ponds can support. But a study by a University of Rhode Island graduate student has found that these ecosystems can withstand continued high rates of aquaculture growth without causing ecological harm. Carrie Byron, a doctoral student in the URI Department of Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science, examined the ecological carrying...

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2010-06-10 10:43:49

Acidity is increasing in some regions of the Chesapeake Bay even faster than is occurring in the open ocean, where it is now recognized that increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolve in the seawater thereby making it more acidic. These more acidic conditions in key parts of Chesapeake Bay reduce rates of juvenile oyster shell formation, according to new research published in the journal Estuaries and Coasts. The study, conducted at the University of Maryland Center for...

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2010-06-01 12:49:35

A new study has reinforced the idea that the first British colonists in America had to endure an unusually severe drought. Jamestown in Virginia was the first successful English settlement in North America. Chemical analysis of shells thrown away from 1611-1612 show that the James River was much saltier then than it is today. This was due to decreased flow from surrounding freshwater rivers. Rainfall must have been much lower when these oysters were growing in order for this to have been...


Latest Bivalves Reference Libraries

Chinese Pond Mussel, Sinanodonta woodiana
2013-10-11 11:20:39

The Chinese Pond Mussel (Sinanodonta woodiana), known also as the Eastern Asiatic Freshwater Clam or the Swan-mussel, is a species of freshwater mussel, an aquatic bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Uniondale, the river mussels. The shell is brown or blackish, occasionally with a greenish hue, the color varying but normally more intensively colored at the periphery. The shape is elliptical to almost spherical, with the lower margin strongly convex. It is native to Eastern Asia but...

Corbicula fluminea
2013-10-11 11:17:31

Corbicula fluminea is a species of freshwater clam, an aquatic bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Corbiculidae. This species is originally from Asian origin, therefore it is often referred to as the Asian Clam or Asiatic Clam. Within the aquarium and koi pond trade it is frequently called the Golden Clam or Golden Freshwater Clam. Within southeast Asia its known as the Prosperity Clam or the Good Luck Clam. It has been introduced into many parts of the world such as North America...

Pinctada Maxima
2013-04-25 16:49:52

Pinctada maxima is a species of pearl oyster, a marine bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Pteriidae, the pearl oysters. There are two different color varieties: the White lipped oyster and the Gold lipped oyster. These bivalves are considered to be the largest pearl oysters in the world. They have a very strong inner shell layer composed of nacre, also known as “mother of pearl”. They’re significant in the cultured pearl industry as they are used to produce South Sea pearls....

Flat Tree Oyster, Isognomon alatus
2013-04-25 16:28:02

The Flat Tree Oyster, Isognomon alatus, is a species of bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Isognomonidae. It can be seen along the Atlantic coast of North America, ranging from southern Florida to Brazil and Bermuda. This oyster has two thin and irregularly shaped valves that are joined by a long straight hinge. The exterior is sculpted by a large number of rough, concentric rings with loose flakes and varies in color from a pale brownish olive to a purplish black. The nacre on the...

Cockscomb Oyster, Lopha cristagalli
2013-04-17 11:50:41

Lopha cristagalli, also known as cockscomb oyster, is a species of marine bivalve mollusks within the family Ostreidae. This species has a shell with the potential to reach a maximum diameter of roughly 20.5 centimeters, 10 centimeters being the most common. The coloration varies from dark to light purple and is thick, strongly ribbed, and slightly inequitable shell. The shell inside is porcelaneous, normally a purplish-brown or whitish. The margins of the valves have a distinctive zig-zag...

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