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Latest Bivalvia Stories

Metabolic Rates Helped Ancient Bivalves Outcompete Brachiopods
2014-03-26 14:38:41

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists at Stanford University are challenging a popular theory about how bivalves outgrew brachiopods. The results of their study have been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. About 250 million years ago, brachiopod groups largely disappeared along with 90 percent of the planet’s species. However, during this time bivalves flourished, branching out into a variety of shapes and sizes and spreading into...

2013-10-02 23:01:00

Laurie Anderson, Ph.D., head and professor of the Department of Geology & Geological Engineering and director of the Museum of Geology at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, has received a $405,080 National Science Foundation grant to examine the functional biodiversity of chemosymbiosis in clams and its role in supporting sensitive coastal biomes. A collaboration among three universities – SDSM&T, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Clemson University –...

2011-09-21 20:43:16

Scientists from the United States, Norway, and Germany create a unique data set for the reconstruction of the phylogeny of molluscs Snails, mussels, squids — as different as they may look, they do have something in common: they all belong to the phylum Mollusca, also called molluscs. An international team of researchers headed by Kevin Kocot and Professor Ken Halanych, USA, with the participation of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Germany, has carried out research into the...

2008-09-30 03:00:21

By Shen, Shu-Zhong Zhang, Yi-Chun ABSTRACT- The uppermost 5-15 m of the Douling Formation in the southern Hunan area. South China, yields a diverse fauna comprised of ammonoids, bivalves, and brachiopods. The brachiopods reported in this paper consist of 51 species in 34 genera and are dominated by the Lopingian (Late Permian) species associated with a few species persisting from the underlying Maokouan (Late Guadalupian). This fauna is of earliest Wuchiapingian in age as precisely...

2008-08-17 18:00:37

By He, Weihong Shi, G R; Bu, Jianjun; Niu, Zhijun ABSTRACT- A new brachiopod fauna is described from the Early and Middle Permian of Zadoi and Zhidoi counties, southern Qinghai (Changdu block), northwest China. This fauna includes 13 species in nine genera with Spinomarginifera concentrica n. sp. and Transennatia waterhousei n. sp. The Early to Middle Permian brachiopod fauna from southern Qinghai is very similar to the contemporary Cathaysian faunas of South China with which the new fauna...


Latest Bivalvia Reference Libraries

Atlanta Winged Oyster, Pteria Colymbus
2013-04-25 20:03:29

The Atlantic Winged Oyster, Pteria Colymbus, is a species of bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Pteriidae. It can be found along the Atlantic coast of North Carolina to Brazil and Bermuda. This Atlantic Winged Oyster grows to about 2.8 inches long and is a distinctive, asymmetric shape. The hinge is long and strait with one wing drawn out a long way and the other one much smaller. The upper valve is brownish, often mottled with some paler markings. The lower valve is smaller and...

Amber Pen Shell, Pinna Carnea
2013-04-25 16:13:01

The Amber Pen Shell, Pinna Carnea, is a species of bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Pinnidae. It can be found in Caribbean waters, ranging from southern Florida to the West Indies and Bermuda. The amber pen shell has a pair of long, thin, and translucent valves and is triangular, fan, or wedge shaped, with a point at one end and a curved and ragged end at the other extremity. The hinge is along the straight side. It has the potential to grow to about 16 inches long though it usually...

Cockscomb Oyster, Lopha cristagalli
2013-04-17 11:50:41

Lopha cristagalli, also known as cockscomb oyster, is a species of marine bivalve mollusks within the family Ostreidae. This species has a shell with the potential to reach a maximum diameter of roughly 20.5 centimeters, 10 centimeters being the most common. The coloration varies from dark to light purple and is thick, strongly ribbed, and slightly inequitable shell. The shell inside is porcelaneous, normally a purplish-brown or whitish. The margins of the valves have a distinctive zig-zag...

Noah's Ark Shell, Arca noae
2013-04-16 21:35:39

Arca Noae, also known as the Noah’s Ark shell, is a species of bivalve mollusk within the family of Arcidae. It’s found in the Mediterranean Sea along with the Adriatic Sea from low tide mark to a depth of about 200 feet. The shell of this species grows to about 4 inches in length. It’s shortened at the anterior end and elongated at the posterior end. It is normally striped in brown and white and has fine sculptured ribs running from the umbones to the margin. The hinge is straight...

Turkey Wing Ark Clam, Arca zebra
2013-04-16 21:32:14

Arca zebra, known also as the turkey wing ark clam, is a bivalve mollusk within the family Arcidae, the ark clams. This species can be found along the Atlantic coast of North America, ranging from North Carolina to the West Indies and Bermuda. It attaches itself to rocks or other hard substrates in shallow water with byssus threads. The shell of this species is boldly striped in brown and white which gives it the look of the wing off of a wild turkey. The whole shell has also been said...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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