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Latest Black-and-white Ruffed Lemur Stories

2013-08-07 10:15:23

Young Malagasy black-and-white ruffed lemurs are more likely to survive when they are raised in communal crèches or “nursery nests" in which their mothers share the draining responsibility of feeding and caring for their offspring.


Latest Black-and-white Ruffed Lemur Reference Libraries

42_216cbdbbe2b5f6a5d6ed5383904bb750
2006-12-27 14:45:05

The Red Ruffed Lemur (Varecia rubra) is one of two species of ruffed lemur, the other being the black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata). Like all lemurs, it is native to Madagascar. It is endemic to the Masoala peninsula in the northeast of the island. The Red Ruffed Lemur grows to be about 7 to 8 lbs and can live up to 20 years in the wild. They eat fruit, leaves, and seeds. This prosimian has litters of up to six and its gestation period is 102 days.

42_195fe2c6a89a618447e713d4eb6c4bac
2006-12-27 14:43:35

The black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) is one of the two species of ruffed lemurs. Like all lemurs, it is native only to Madagascar. Black-and-white ruffed lemurs can grow up to 2 ft long. They are typically a little smaller, and about 7 to 10 lb. Their lifespan in captivity is about 18 years but many live to 20. Black-and-white ruffed lemurs are black with white areas on their limbs head and back. Their neck has a mane and the face has a muzzle like a dog's. Males and...

42_1f2aa33681936183cd18fd808ae87789
2006-12-27 14:32:19

The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a large prosimian, a lemur belonging to the family Lemuridae. The ring-tailed lemur is the only species within the monotypic genus Lemur. It is found only on the island of Madagascar. Although threatened by habitat destruction and therefore listed as vulnerable by the IUCN Red List, the Ring-tailed Lemur is the most populous lemur in zoos worldwide. They reproduce readily in captivity. Physical description Mostly grey with white underneath, the...

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Word of the Day
bretelles
  • In dressmaking, straps running from the belt in front over the shoulders to the belt in the back, with more or less elaboration of trimming and outline. They usually broaden at the shoulder and narrow toward the waist.
The word 'bretelles' comes from a French word meaning 'braces'.