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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 11:25 EDT

Latest Black-backed Woodpecker Stories

2008-08-14 15:00:35

By MARK A. GONZALEZ Have you ever walked among the smoldering carcasses of burnt trees? Have you walked through the lunar landscape left by a wildfire? It is an eerie experience. Dust devils of ash whirl across a bleak landscape. The wind whistles through blackened branches; and strong winds are terrifying, because weak, burnt trunks creak from the splintering of falling trees. Dust and ash irritate your eyes, throat and nose. Blackened tree corpses cover hillslopes like tombstones...


Latest Black-backed Woodpecker Reference Libraries

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2006-07-17 13:54:28

The Black-backed Woodpecker, (Picoides arcticus), is a medium-sized woodpecker. Adults are black on the head, back, wings and rump. They are white from the throat to the belly; the flanks are white with black bars. Their tail is black with white outer feathers. Like the similar American Three-toed Woodpecker, this bird also has three-toed feet. The adult male has a yellow cap. Their breeding habitat is boreal forest across Canada, Alaska and the north-western United States. They nest in...

38_a2e8fd04b66f5cc3560749f059591ced
2006-07-17 13:52:33

The Three-toed Woodpecker, Picoides tridactylus, is a medium-sized woodpecker. The adult is 8.5 to 9.5 inches in length. It is black on the head, wings and rump, and white from the throat to the belly. The flanks are white with black bars. The back is white with black bars, and the tail is black with the white outer feathers barred with black. The adult male has a yellow cap. In North America, the Three-toed Woodpecker can be confused with the Black-backed Woodpecker, which it closely...

38_ea647264cbfb30b52e450eee0686c3cc
2006-07-17 13:49:50

The White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is a non-migratory woodpecker that resides in pine forests of the mountains of western North America. It has a black body, (approximately 8 inches long), and white head. It has white primary feathers that form a crescent in flight. Males have a red spot at the nape of the neck. The range of the White-headed Woodpecker stretches in the mountains from British Columbia through southern California. They form nests in dead trees or snags and...

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