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Latest Black fly Stories

2014-07-08 23:13:57

RESCUE!® fly traps are proven summer solutions for nuisance or filth flies. Spokane, WA (PRWEB) July 08, 2014 Flies are common, annoying and unsanitary. But they’re more than just a nuisance. They’re carriers of filth and more than 60 human and animal diseases. With temperatures warming, experts warn that hot, humid conditions create ideal environments for flies to breed and develop. “The warmer the weather, the faster the flies are produced,” says Dr. Qing-He Zhang, Ph.D.,...

2012-04-09 13:22:13

Black flies drink blood and spread disease such as river blindness-creating misery with their presence. A University of Georgia study, however, proves that the pesky insects can be useful. Don Champagne, an entomology professor with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, discovered a way to use the black fly's blood-sucking tactics for medical advancement. "In order to feed on blood, these insects have to contend with our natural defense agents against blood...

2011-04-28 00:00:29

Tender Corp. Launches Second Annual Natrapel® 8 Hour "ËœDitch the DEET' Photo Contest Top Prizes Include Vacations to New Hampshire's White Mountains Region, Plus Outdoor Gear from Eastern Mountain Sports® & Adventure® Medical Kits Littleton, NH (PRWEB) April 27, 2011 Tender Corp., a leading developer of skincare and first aid products designed for active lifestyles, today announced the official launch of the second annual "ËœDitch the DEET' online...

2009-11-21 13:45:00

WASHINGTON, Nov. 21 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A regional initiative launched in the 1990s to eliminate onchocerciasis (river blindness) in the Americas has substantially reduced the prevalence of the disease in recent years, as evidenced by a 31% decrease in the number of individuals requiring mass drug administration in six endemic countries. Results were reported today at the 58th annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). The reported progress...

2009-07-03 12:03:17

A new drug to be tested in three African countries could greatly reduce cases of onchocerciasis, commonly called river blindness, health officials said. This is a devastating illness that has plagued 30 African countries for centuries, said Dr. Uche Amazigo, director of the African Program for Onchocerciasis Control. More than 100 million Africans are at risk of infection from the disease, Amazigo said. The drug, moxidectin, developed by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, kills the larvae and adult worms...

2009-04-13 07:55:04

The saliva from a fly may be able to save someone's eyesight. Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have found what they call a "magic potion" of proteins in the saliva of the black fly that help it spread parasites that cause onchocerciasis or river blindness "“  a devastating eye-disease. They say a better understanding of these proteins may lead to better drugs and a vaccine for river blindness and other diseases spread by biting insects....

2008-06-24 02:29:44

Scientists said black flies are thicker than ever in Maine this year, thanks in part to efforts to clean up lakes and rivers. The federal Clean Water Act of 1972 has resulted in cleaner waterways and provided new habitats for black flies around the Penobscot and Kennebec rivers, where the flies hadn't been seen before, the Boston Globe said Monday. Scientists said only the hardiest of the gnat-sized, biting insects could survive when Maine's rivers were contaminated by paper mills, raw...


Latest Black fly Reference Libraries

Onchocerca volvulus
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Onchocerca volvulus is a species of roundworm that is classified within the Nematoda phylum. This species causes the disease onchocerciasis, more commonly known as river blindness. The life cycle of this species is dependent upon an intermediate host, typically the black fly, and a definitive host, which is always a human. Its lifecycle begins when a black fly ingests microfilariae from a human host by consuming blood. The microfilariae that were present in the skin of the human host now...

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Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'