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Latest Blood flow Stories

2009-10-26 14:35:42

What causes blood cells to deform, and how does deformation affect blood flow? Red blood cells, which make up 45 percent of blood, normally take the shape of circular cushions with a dimple on either side. But they can sometimes deform into an asymmetrical slipper shape. A team of physicists have used simulations to explore how fluid flow might be responsible for this deformation, as well as how the deformation in turn affects blood flow. The insights could help understand the mechanisms...

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2009-06-23 13:50:00

Italian researchers have discovered that human blood flow and respiratory rates can follow the pace of music, which suggests that doctors could one day use music as part of rehabilitation for patients suffering from heart disease or stroke. Writing in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, Dr. Luciano Bernardi and colleagues said that the heart rate of healthy adults appeared to change along with the change in musical rhythms. The researchers had previously discovered that...

2009-02-03 09:54:01

U.S. medical researchers have discovered a grid of small arteries at the surface of the brain redirects and controls blood flow following a stroke. University of California-San Diego scientists say they found the mesh-like network adjusts to restore normal supply when blood slows after a stroke. This is optimistic news, said Professor David Kleinfeld, whose team studies blood flow in animal models of stroke. Damage from stroke can continue for hours or even days as compromised brain tissue...

2009-01-13 09:00:00

OTTAWA, Jan. 13 /PRNewswire/ - Researchers at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI) have successfully grown blood vessels in damaged muscle tissue by injecting a biomaterial developed specifically to attract new cells and support regeneration. Blood vessel regeneration suggests that the body's own cells might one day be used to repair heart damage and restore function. Details of the regeneration process were published online in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies...

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2008-12-01 14:02:49

Older adults who exercise regularly show increased cerebral blood flow and a greater number of small blood vessels in the brain, according to findings presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The study, conducted at the University of North Carolina (UNC) "“ Chapel Hill, is the first to compare brain scans of older adults who exercise to brain scans of those who do not. "Our results show that exercise may reduce age-related changes in...

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2008-11-12 16:47:41

U.S. researchers reported on Tuesday that the enjoyment of listening to music may also benefit the human heart. By dilating blood vessels in similar form to laughing or taking blood medications, music can actively strengthen the human heart. "We have a pretty impressive effect," said Dr. Michael Miller, director of preventive cardiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. "Blood vessel diameter improved, the vessel opened up pretty significantly. You can see the...

2008-06-25 00:02:49

U.S. researchers say a key protein drives the clogging of arteries and that lowering levels of the protein opens arteries. Dr. Bradford C. Berk at the University of Rochester Medical Center said the work establishes cyclophilin A as an exciting target in the design of drugs against atherosclerosis, the No. 1 cause of heart attacks and strokes, which occur when vessels become completely blocked. While the study was in mice, higher levels of the study protein have also been found in the...

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2008-01-07 12:10:00

A 5-year laboratory study conducted by the University of Cincinnati (UC) shows that people who experience brief periods of blocked blood flow may be better conditioned to survive a full-blown heart attack later. According to a recent press release: UC surgeon-scientist Karyn Butler, MD, found that when the heart experiences short periods of stress, either from reduced blood flow or high blood pressure, it activates a protective molecular pathway - known as JAK-STAT - that protects the heart...

2006-01-26 15:30:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Drinking two cups of caffeinated coffee decreases blood flow to the heart during exercise, researchers report, and the reduction may be most pronounced at high altitudes. While healthy people may tolerate the reduced blood flow fairly easily, it may be harmful to people with coronary artery disease. Dr. Philipp A. Kaufmann and colleagues from University Hospital Zurich, examined the immediate effects of caffeine on blood flow to the heart at rest and after exercise...

2006-01-20 11:15:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- Sitting through a funny movie seems to be as good for your heart as running through the park, a small study suggests. In an experiment with 20 healthy young adults, researchers found that participants' blood flow improved when they watched a movie that made them laugh. In fact, the circulation boost was similar to what's been seen with aerobic exercise, according to findings published in the February issue of the medical journal Heart. However, that doesn't mean...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.