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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 5:04 EDT

Latest Blower door Stories

2012-12-04 08:23:09

CHICAGO, Dec. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- On January 1, when Illinois adopts a new statewide building energy code, every home built will need to be tested for tightness of the building envelope and the ductwork. In order to help supply competent professionals everywhere across the state, a new certification training will be offered by the non-profit Illinois Association of Energy Raters & Home Performance Professionals (IAER). (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20121204/PH23143LOGO-a...

2012-07-16 23:03:36

A Florida house constructed with Element, LLC´s building envelope demonstrates built in sustainability three times better than newly adopted IECC standards. Fort Myers, Florida (PRWEB) July 16, 2012 Element, a South Florida company, recently announced the results of a blower door test on one of their homes. This code prescribed test checks the building for air leakage, critical to attaining a healthy and efficient indoor air quality. The SSIP provides designers, builders and owners...

2012-04-10 06:23:00

AUSTIN, Texas, April 10, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The Texas State Energy Conservation Office recently announced that in response to the success of the Energy Code Update Workshops, they will continue offering the workshops in cities across Texas through April 2012. In addition, SECO will be adding new Compliance Software Workshops. Apple Energy Group, the training provider, will conduct the April workshops in Amarillo, Arlington, Austin, Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Dallas, El Paso, Houston, and...

2009-08-03 11:27:00

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Aug. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Huber Engineered Woods LLC, leading manufacturer of innovative building solutions, recently reaffirmed its ZIP System(R) wall sheathing and ZIP System(R) tape as the premier air barrier assembly for builders seeking green certification by passing the rigorous ASTM E 2357 Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage of Air Barrier Assemblies. The ZIP System test results exhibited air-leakage rates significantly under the already stringent standard...

2005-10-07 13:33:46

U.S. commercial building owners could save substantially on annual heating and cooling energy costs by improving airtightness of their buildings' envelope, according to a recent National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) study. The research used simulation software to evaluate the energy impact of improved air barriers in three typical non-residential buildings in five cities, each in a different climate zone. The results predicted potential annual heating and cooling energy cost...