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Latest BMJ Stories

Parents Of Those Who’ve Lost Children Die Earlier
2011-09-08 08:52:00

  Researchers compared deaths among parents who had lost their children in the first year of a child´s life or whose child had been stillborn, against deaths among parents whose baby had survived beyond the first year and discovered that those parents, especially mothers, were more likely to die in the next 10 years, AFP is reporting. The study, published in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, focused on a random 5 percent sample of UK death registrations among parents whose...

2011-05-13 00:00:31

Isabel Healthcare and the BMJ Group will offer a fully integrated version of their class leading decision support products for clinicians. The innovative new product will merge the unique ability of Isabel to produce a differential list using multiple patient specific clinical features with the BMJ Group Best Practice's comprehensive knowledge base to create an even richer clinical experience for users. Ann Arbor, MI (PRWEB) May 12, 2011 Isabel Healthcare and the BMJ Group are pleased to...

2011-02-24 20:48:26

A survey on self-assessed well-being in a cohort of chronic locked-in syndrome patients: happy majority, miserable minority Most "locked-in syndrome" patients say they are happy, and many of the factors reported by those who say they are unhappy can be improved, suggest the results of the largest survey of its kind, published in the launch issue of the new online journal BMJ Open. The findings are likely to challenge the perception that these patients can no longer enjoy quality of life and...

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2011-01-28 11:00:00

Student BMJ editorial: Are relationships good for you? The 'smug marrieds' may have good reason to feel pleased with themselves as experts today confirm that long-term committed relationships are good for mental and physical health and this benefit increases over time. In an editorial published by student BMJ, David and John Gallacher from Cardiff University say that on average married people live longer. They say that women in committed relationships have better mental health, while men in...

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2011-01-25 08:30:00

Famous composer Frederic Chopin, who experienced regular hallucinations during his lifetime, most likely experienced those visions because he suffered from a form of epilepsy, a pair of Spanish researchers claim in a new study. In their investigation, Manuel Vazquez Caruncho and Francisco Branas Fernandez of the Xeral-Calde Hospital Complex in Lugo studied Chopin's letters, as well as descriptions of what he experienced written by those closest to him, including his partner, George Sand, and...

2011-01-19 14:01:42

Secrets of the MMR scare: The Lancet's 2 days to bury bad news A series of denials and a failure to formally investigate allegations of misconduct in Andrew Wakefield's MMR research meant the public was misled about the credibility of the paper for six years. Dr Fiona Godlee, BMJ Editor in Chief, says the UK has consistently failed to take research misconduct seriously. She calls on the UK government to establish mandatory oversight of clinical research integrity within the NHS, as happens...

2010-12-11 00:19:48

Red for danger: The effects of red hair in surgical practice A study in the BMJ's Christmas issue published on bmj.com today confirms that there is no need for doctors to fear red heads. The research concludes that, contrary to popular belief, people with red hair do not bleed any more than other patients. The authors, led by surgeon Jonathan Barry from Morriston Hospital in Swansea, say that "red haired patients are traditionally regarded with a degree of trepidation by surgeons and...

2010-11-18 13:57:06

Editorial: Health and climate change Several leading medical journals have come together to urge health professionals everywhere to put health at the heart of climate change negotiations. An editorial published simultaneously in the BMJ, the Lancet and the Finnish Medical Journal today, warns that the links between climate policy and health policy must not be overlooked. The editorial has also been made available for publication in all peer reviewed medical journals worldwide through the...

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2010-10-29 09:45:00

Changing clocks to allow for more daylight hours during the afternoon could make people happier and healthier, and it could even help save the planet, according to a new study published in the latest edition of the British Medical Journal (BMJ). The paper, which was written by Mayer Hillman, senior fellow emeritus with the Policy Studies Institute in London's University of Westminster, suggests adding one additional hour to Greenwich Mean Time year-round and two hours during 'Daylight...

2010-10-27 14:07:35

Press release from PLoS Medicine Journals need to develop policies to handle the inevitable competing interests that arise when they publish papers that may bring them reprint revenue or increase their impact factors. This is the conclusion of a research article by Andreas Lundh and colleagues from the Nordic Cochrane Centre published in this weeks PLoS Medicine. An accompanying perspective by Harvey Marcovitch, ex-chair of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), and an editorial from the...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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