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Latest Body mass index Stories

2012-10-24 11:58:40

Higher levels of activity, lower BMI may help to protect them against Type 2 diabetes, even if they gain weight as adults Old Order Amish children are much more physically active and three times less likely to be overweight than non-Amish children, which may provide them with some long-term protection against developing Type 2 diabetes, University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers report in the journal Diabetes Care. The researchers found that Amish children in Lancaster...

Weight Associated With Hospitalization Risk
2012-10-21 10:10:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports — Your Universe Online Overweight individuals, even those who are not clinically obese, are more likely to be hospitalized than those who are lean, fit, and in good physical condition, the Australian researchers behind a new study have discovered. According to Genevra Pittman of Reuters Health, the study discovered that for every six or seven pounds a middle-aged adult carries, the chances they will have to be admitted to a hospital within the...

2012-10-21 04:03:15

How to lose weight fast for teenage girls guide is now available for download from the Weight Loss Success Plan website. This guide is providing a safe and healthy alternative for teens to use to shed extra body weight in time for school photos and extra curricular activities. Charleston, South Carolina (PRWEB) October 21, 2012 Losing weight is one subject that most adults deal with although teenage weight loss is a growing issue. The ingestion of too many high calorie foods and not enough...

Morbidly Obese Making U.S. Fatter, Quicker
2012-10-02 20:50:09

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online America has often been teased about our expanding waistlines and bulging bellies. Our affinity for cheap food fast, and lots of it, has brought us to a point where more than one-third of American adults are obese. This includes having Body Mass Indexes of 30 or more, according to the CDC. Though we may be getting fat on cheaper food, we´re paying more in medical costs to keep us upright. According to a recent survey,...

2012-09-26 22:58:32

Previous studies may have underestimated the effect on future health, say authors Being obese as a child or adolescent may have a larger effect on future health than previously thought, suggests a study published on bmj.com today. It comes as New York City passes a ban on large-size sugary drinks to help tackle obesity and related health problems in the US. MPs are now calling on the government to introduce similar legislation in the UK. Researchers at the University of Oxford show...

2012-09-19 16:32:53

Could the impact of chronic stress explain why American black girls are more likely to be overweight than white girls? According to Dr. Tomiyama of the University of California, Los Angeles in the U.S., and her colleagues, higher levels of stress over 10 years predict greater increases in body weight over time in both black and white girls. However, the experience of chronic stress appears to have a greater negative effect on black girls' weight, which may explain racial disparities in...

2012-09-18 13:53:14

A study comparing bariatric surgical procedures for obesity suggests that even though undergoing the less commonly used biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch (DS) may be associated with higher early risks compared with gastric bypass (GB), the DS appears to achieve better weight loss and control of co-existing illnesses, especially among patients whose body mass index (BMI) was more than 50, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Surgery, a JAMA Network publication....

2012-09-17 23:06:11

A new study published today in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (APNM)  looks beyond the much-feared weight gain common to first-year students and reports on the full 4-year impact of higher education on weight, BMI, and body composition. "Gropper et al. present a unique study that follows students through their undergraduate years. It documents the nature of the weight gain and shows the differences between males and females,” says Susan Whiting, a...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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