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Latest Bog bodies Stories

2006-07-30 20:05:37

By Kevin Smith DUBLIN (Reuters) - Life in the Iron Age may have been nasty, brutish and short but people still found time to style their hair and polish their fingernails -- and that was just the men. These are the findings of scientists who have been examining the latest preserved prehistoric bodies to emerge from Ireland's peat bogs -- the first to be found in Europe for 20 years. One of the bodies, churned up by a peat-cutting machine at Clonycavan near Dublin in 2003, had...

2006-01-07 06:35:00

LONDON -- The preserved remains of two prehistoric men discovered in an Irish bog have revealed a couple of surprises --- one used hair gel and the other stood 6 foot 6 inches high, the tallest Iron Age body discovered. "He would have been a giant...the other man was quite short, about 5 foot 2 inches," said Ned Kelly, head of antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland. "The shorter man appeared to attempt to give himself greater stature by a rather curious headdress which was a bit like a...

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2005-07-06 14:47:03

PITTSBURGH -- The seven mummies on display at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History are nowhere near as famous as King Tut, but they are just as intriguing. Take the 2,000-year-old body of a teenager, found in the Netherlands. Who was she? Who killed her and why? She certainly was killed; the remains of the cord used to strangle her are still visible around her neck, a century after she was found in a peat bog. Was the killing of "Yde Girl" a punishment, or ritual? The exhibit, "The...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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