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Latest Bombus terrestris Stories

Bees Tongue Size Matters For A Good Relationship With Flowers
2014-07-17 03:12:23

Ecological Society of America For bees and the flowers they pollinate, a compatible tongue length is essential to a successful relationship. Some bees and plants are very closely matched, with bee tongue sized to the flower depth. Other bee species are generalists, flitting among flower species to drink nectar and collect pollen from a diverse variety of plants. Data on tongue lengths can help ecologists understand and predict the behavior, resilience and invasiveness of bee populations....

Bumblebee Queens Travel Far And Away Before Starting New Homes
2014-07-01 13:15:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study published in the journal Molecular Ecology found that queen bumblebees fly long distances to establish new colonies. The study was based on observations of five different species, including four common and one rare species, in nearly 7.7 square miles of farmland in southern England. The researchers found that queens nesting near one another were barely related or completely unrelated for all five species. The study team...

Peaceful Bumblebee Invades South America
2013-12-09 10:12:21

ETH Zurich Bumblebees look cute. They have a thick fur, fly somewhat clumsily and are less aggressive than honeybees or wasps. They are very much appreciated by farmers as keen pollen collectors. Particularly in the context of the crisis-stricken honeybee populations, the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, is being bred on an industrial scale for the pollination of fruit and vegetable crops both inside and outside greenhouses. It was hoped that these insects would take over these...

Tighter Controls On Bee Imports Needed To Reduce Disease Risk To Native Populations
2013-07-18 15:19:49

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers, publishing a study in the Journal of Applied Ecology, wrote that stricter controls over bee imports are needed in order to prevent diseases from spreading to the native bumblebee and honeybee populations. Farmers bring in commercially-produced and imported bumblebees for pollination of greenhouse crops like tomatoes. These bees are used to enhance pollination of other food crops, such as strawberries, and are marketed for...

Bumblebees Learn To Take Cues From Honeybees
2012-02-15 04:29:01

Bumblebees can use cues from their rivals the honeybees to learn where the best food resources are, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London. Writing in the journal PLoS ONE, the team from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences explain how they trained a colony of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to use cues provided by a different species, the honeybee (Apis mellifera), as well as cues provided by fellow bumblebees to locate food resources on...

2011-08-17 12:18:11

Bumblebees use complex problem solving skills to minimise the energy they use when flying to collect food, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London. For the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), as with many other animals, the simplest approach to finding more nectar would be to fly to the nearest neighbouring flower, particularly considering their tiny brain size. But a team from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences has found that this isn't the case. The...

2011-06-29 12:58:27

It is a mathematical puzzle which has vexed academics and travelling salesmen alike, but new research from Queen Mary, University of London's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, reveals how bumblebees effectively plan their route between the most rewarding flowers while travelling the shortest distances. The research, led by Dr Mathieu Lihoreau and published in the British Ecological Society's Functional Ecology, explored the movement of bumblebees, Bombus terrestris, as they...

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2010-03-05 09:00:00

Recent years have seen an unusual rise in the number of bees about in the cold winter months, and scientists are now beginning to find out why. While most bees are hibernating, the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, is out taking advantage of exotic winter-flowering plants in our gardens and parks, according to scientists from Queen Mary, University of London. The study, published in the journal PLoS One, suggests this unique species raises an extra generation of workers to collect...

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2008-08-14 10:20:00

Bumblebees choose whether to search for food according to how stocked their nests are, say scientists from Queen Mary, University of London. When bumblebees return to the nest from a successful foraging mission, they produce a pheromone which encourages their nest mates to also go out and find food. Scientists had originally thought that these pheromones elicited a standard response from all bees. But new research from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences has shown that...


Latest Bombus terrestris Reference Libraries

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2005-09-09 09:43:40

The bumblebee is a flying insect of the genus Bombus in the family Apidae and a relative of the common honeybee. The bumblebee feeds on nectar and gathers pollen to feed its young. They are beneficial to humans and the plant world alike, and tend to be larger than other members of the bee family. Most bumblebee species are gentle. From this comes their original name: "Humblebee". Bumblebees are social insects that are known for their black and yellow striped bodies, a commonality among the...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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