Quantcast

Latest Bonobo Stories

7c6f4e1f9e6bd1d24dfbab604d19f18e1
2011-03-07 10:50:00

Humans share 98.7 percent of our DNA with chimpanzees, but we share one important similarity with one species of chimp, the common chimpanzee, that we don't share with the other, the bonobo. That similarity is violence. While humans and the common chimpanzee wage war and kill each other, bonobos do not. "There has never been a recorded case in captivity or in the wild of a bonobo killing another bonobo," notes anthropologist Brian Hare. Hare is an assistant professor in evolutionary...

a57b62d672ca4817720bf3784ecc0903
2011-02-07 07:27:34

Puzzled scientists are debating if the shrinking brains of humans is a sign we are growing dumber or that evolution is making the key motor leaner and more efficient. The average size of modern human brains has decreased about 10 percent during the last 30,000 years -- from 1,500 to 1,359 cubic centimeters, the size of a tennis ball, reports the AFP news agency. The brains of females, which are on average smaller than those of men, have also experienced an equivalent drop in size. These...

2010-12-14 00:01:39

New Initiative to Fund Field Conservation Projects Silver Spring, MD (Vocus) December 13, 2010 The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Ape Taxon Advisory Group (TAG) today announced a critical new campaign to sustain a future for one of the planet's most imperiled group of animals"” apes. For apes"”bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, gibbons and siamangs"”the outlook in the wild is bleak. Given catastrophic population declines, it is estimated that some ape...

b27fa613fec6e8674ef0e14aff20bcdb
2010-09-01 11:20:18

High social status and maternal support play an important role in the mating success of male bonobos Success makes sexy - this does not only apply to human beings, but also to various animals. Male bonobos appear to benefit from this phenomenon as well. A team of researchers led by Gottfried Hohmann of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has discovered that the higher up a male bonobo is placed in the social hierarchy, the greater his mating success is with female bonobos....

2010-06-30 08:30:09

The average man experiences hormone changes similar to the passive bonobo prior to competition, but a "status-striving" man undergoes changes that mirror those found in a chimpanzee, say researchers from Duke and Harvard universities. A new study published Monday June 28 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals differing hormone levels in our two closest relatives, bonobos and chimpanzees, in anticipation of competition. Chimpanzees live in male-dominated societies where...

3d7452ab0fccf4d7782c78add5d929641
2010-05-13 09:05:00

Duke University assistant professor Brian Hare and colleagues study the behavior of bonobos -- apes that are genetically close to humans Primatologist Brian Hare wishes more people could discover what bonobos can teach us about human nature. "I really think they are the smartest ape in the world," he said. "We have a lot to learn from them." Bonobos are genetically close to humans, yet most people know very little about them. Through his ongoing research, Hare hopes to change that....

2010-05-07 13:55:24

The Wildlife Conservation Society announced the results of the first-ever evaluation of a large, "landscape-wide" conservation approach to protect globally important populations of elephants and great apes. The study looked at wildlife populations in northern Republic of Congo over a mosaic of land-use types, including a national park, a community-managed reserve, and various logging concessions. It found that core protected areas "“ coupled with strong anti-poaching efforts "“...

b43f948d77dc76bf8fdc311c011541011
2010-03-24 10:43:53

Study suggests nonhuman animals also have metacognitive abilities - they know about what they have seen Great apes "“ orangutans, chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas "“ realize that they can be wrong when making choices, according to Dr. Josep Call from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Dr. Call's study was just published online in Springer's journal, Animal Cognition. In a series of three experiments, seven gorillas, eight chimpanzees, four...

2010-03-15 15:56:06

When we notice somebody pointing at something, we automatically look in the direction of the gesture. In humans, the ability to understand this type of gesturing (known as declarative communication) may seem to be an automatic response, but it is actually a sign of sophisticated communication behavior. Numerous studies have tried to determine if great apes (for example, chimpanzees and bonobos) are able to understand declarative communication, but results have been mixed. Psychological...

9c0c48de8fbdfe82fdfee2e816d05e21
2010-03-01 15:10:00

Des Moines, Iowa -- You may have more in common with Kanzi, Panbanisha and Nyota, three language-competent bonobos living at Great Ape Trust, than you thought. And those similarities, right at your fingertip, might one day tell scientists more about the effect of culture on neurological disorders that limit human expression. Among humans, pointing is a universal language, an alternative to spoken words to convey a message. Before they speak, infants point, a gesture scientists agree is...


Latest Bonobo Reference Libraries

42_b930844f51804cc26e959c61a14dff26
2007-01-02 11:10:29

The bonobo (Pan paniscus), until recently is usually called the pygmy chimpanzee and less often the dwarf or gracile chimpanzee. It is one of the two species of chimpanzees. Physical characteristics Its head is smaller than that of the Common Chimpanzee but has a higher forehead. It has a black face with pink lips, small ears, wide nostrils, and long hair on its head. Females have slightly prominent breasts in contrast to the flat breasts of other female apes, though not as prominent...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related