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Latest Botryllus schlosseri Stories

2011-08-02 14:11:11

An international team of molecular scientists have discovered that star ascidians, also known as sea squirts, have pacemaker cells similar to that of the human heart. The research, published in the JEZ A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology, may offer a new insight into the early evolution of the heart as star ascidians are one of the closest related invertebrates to mammals. The research team, led by Annette Hellbach from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Germany, expected to find...

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2011-04-17 07:29:20

Studies of the small sea squirt may ultimately help solve the problem of rejection of organ and bone marrow transplants in humans, according to scientists at UC Santa Barbara. An average of 20 registered patients die every day waiting for transplants, due to the shortage of matching donor organs. More than 110,000 people are currently waiting for organ transplants in the U.S. alone. Currently, only one in 20,000 donors are a match for a patient waiting for a transplant. These grim statistics...


Latest Botryllus schlosseri Reference Libraries

Star Ascidian, Botryllus schlosseri
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Star Ascidian (Botryllus schlosseri), also known as the Golden Star Tunicate, is a species of invasive ascidian tunicate which can be found almost throughout the world’s oceans. Its native range is within the Atlantic Ocean from the Bay of Fundy to North Carolina, and is the most common colonial tunicate in North America. It grows on slow-moving, submerged objects, plants, and animals in near shore environments. This invasive colonial zooid grows to less than 0.25 inches in size....

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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