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Latest Brain–computer interface Stories

Emotiv - Hacking The Human Brain
2012-08-27 09:45:58

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Our minds are often the most secure place we can go to think thoughts otherwise unspeakable to human ears. We may not agree with every thought we have and might even be ashamed by many of them, yet there they are, striking the core of our minds like lightning; quick and unpredictable. As such, it could be quite embarrassing and frightening to know someone not only has access to our brains, but knows what we´re thinking....

Code In Brain Key To Pronouncing Vowels, Could Help Speech Paralysis
2012-08-22 14:23:42

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Loss of muscle functioning in the body. Difficulty transferring message from the brain to muscles. These are just a few traits of paralysis that scientists examined in terms of its relationship to speech. A recent study by University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Technion, Israel's Institute of Technology, researchers revealed a code in the brain that helps pronounce vowels. According to the researchers, human speech...

2012-08-20 22:19:47

Research results reported in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience Amputation disrupts not only the peripheral nervous system but also central structures of the brain. While the brain is able to adapt and compensate for injury in certain conditions, in amputees the traumatic event prevents adaptive cortical changes. A group of scientists reports adaptive plastic changes in an amputee's brain following implantation of multielectrode arrays inside peripheral nerves. Their results are...

'Sugar' New Energy Source For Future Medical Implants
2012-06-13 16:48:00

Implantable fuel cell built at MIT could power neural prosthetics that help patients regain control of limbs. MIT engineers have developed a fuel cell that runs on the same sugar that powers human cells: glucose. This glucose fuel cell could be used to drive highly efficient brain implants of the future, which could help paralyzed patients move their arms and legs again. The fuel cell, described in the June 12 edition of the journal PLoS ONE, strips electrons from glucose molecules to...

Paralyzed Woman Moves Robot Arm With Her Brain
2012-05-17 07:05:43

[ Watch the Video ] Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com For one lucky woman, 15 years of paralysis was broken on Saturday, April 12 when the 58-year-old woman, who is unable to speak, controlled a robotic arm by thinking about a particular action. This resulted in the robotic arm picking up a bottle of coffee, lifting it her to mouth, allowing her to take a sip. This feat is part of the progress made in a project regarding brain-computer interfaces restorative neurotechnology and assistive...

Swiss Robot Gives Paraplegic Man Mobility Via Mind-Control
2012-04-25 07:25:57

Mobility is something most of us take for granted, and when we lose that ability through paralysis we lose a huge part of our independence. Now, a team of Swiss scientists are making strides in giving paraplegics back at least some of their mobility through the use of a new mind-controlled robot. The robot is controlled by the brainwaves of a paraplegic wearing an electrode-fitted cap. The person wearing the cap, Mark-Andre Duc, demonstrated the device from a hospital in the Swiss town of...

2012-04-20 12:10:08

New technology bypasses spinal cord and delivers electrical signals from brain directly to muscles A new Northwestern Medicine brain-machine technology delivers messages from the brain directly to the muscles -- bypassing the spinal cord -- to enable voluntary and complex movement of a paralyzed hand. The device could eventually be tested on, and perhaps aid, paralyzed patients. "We are eavesdropping on the natural electrical signals from the brain that tell the arm and hand how to...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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