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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 21:23 EDT

Latest Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Stories

2011-02-08 08:00:00

TORONTO, Feb. 8 /PRNewswire/ - A new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has found evidence suggesting that a variation of a specific gene may play a role in late-onset Alzheimer's, the disease which accounts for over 90% of Alzheimer's cases. This innovative study has combined genetics and brain imaging to determine who may be at risk for developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease long before symptoms appear. The gene, which is called brain-derived...

2010-12-14 00:56:32

Research at UT Health Science Center San Antonio suggests novel therapy target Scientists at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio restored learning and memory in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model by increasing a protein called CBP. Salvatore Oddo, Ph.D., of the university's Department of Physiology and Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, said this is the first proof that boosting CBP, which triggers the production of other proteins essential to creating memories, can...

2010-11-16 19:08:59

Research into immunity, stress and key cellular molecules may lead to more effective therapies New animal research has identified factors, such as the stress response and immune system, that may play important roles in depression. Scientists have also found that the regulation of nerve cell signals influences depression in animals, and that new drug combinations may more effectively treat it. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience...

2010-11-10 13:21:00

SARASOTA, Fla., Nov. 10, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- StemCellRegenMed, Inc. announces that a new stem cell gene and enzyme replacement treatment has been performed on a fourteen month old child with Tay-Sachs disease on November 2, 2010. Tay-Sachs is a devastating disease that afflicts children primarily of parents of Jewish heritage and in very rare cases families of Eastern European background and the Cajun region in the U.S.A. The children appear normal at birth but about six months of age they...

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2010-10-18 11:53:45

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered how cocaine corrupts the brain and becomes addictive. These findings"”the first to connect activation of specific neurons to alterations in cocaine reward"”were published in Science on October 15. The results may help researchers in developing new ways of treating those addicted to the drug. Led by Mary Kay Lobo, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Neuroscience at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and first author of the study,...

2010-09-09 01:11:10

Addictive drugs are known to induce changes in the brain's reward circuits that may underlie drug craving and relapse after long periods of abstinence. Now, new research, published by Cell Press in the September 9 issue of the journal Neuron, uncovers a specific neural mechanism that may be linked to persistent drug-seeking behavior and could help to guide strategies for development of new therapies for cocaine addiction. Previous research has shown that the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a...

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2010-08-08 20:30:44

Kerry Ressler's research on the molecular biology of fear could lead to better methods for treating individuals suffering from anxiety disordersKerry Ressler wants to understand the molecular biology of fear."We're studying how the biology of the brain is changed by the environment, and how these changes underlie memories and experiences," said Ressler, an associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University School of Medicine and Yerkes National...

2010-07-08 15:04:27

When mice with cancer get a boost in their social life and an upgrade in living conditions, their tumors shrink, and their cancers more often go into spontaneous remission Reported in the July 9th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, these findings offer powerful new evidence of the critical role that social connection and an individual's mental state, may play in cancer. "Animals' interaction with the environment has a profound influence on the growth of cancer "“ more...

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2010-06-04 07:00:00

Researchers at the University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine have found a way to pharmacologically induce a memory of safety in the brain of rats. As reported in the June, 4 2010 issue of Science, administering brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) into the prefrontal cortex prevented rats from expressing fear to a tone that had been previously paired with a shock. Rats given BDNF acted as if they had received repeated presentations of the tone without the shock, a procedure called...

2010-06-03 17:15:40

Finding suggests possibilities for future treatment of anxiety disorders Researchers have found a way to pharmacologically induce a memory of safety in the brain of rats, mimicking the effect of training. The finding suggests possibilities for new treatments for individuals suffering from anxiety disorders. Rats normally freeze when they hear a tone they have been conditioned to associate with an electric shock. The reaction can be extinguished by repeatedly exposing the rats to the tone with...