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Latest Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Stories

2009-04-20 09:58:52

A research collaboration between Australia and Israel has identified a genetic variation that influences the severity of symptoms in Rett syndrome. The finding is published in the latest edition of the international journal Neurology. Dr Helen Leonard, who heads the Australian Rett Syndrome Study at the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, said the finding was exciting in that it identifies a potential new target for treatment of the debilitating neurological disorder. "We know that...

2009-04-06 09:12:53

Can people's differing reactions to situations of stress be attributed at least in part to genetic differences and do those differences affect men and women in different ways "“ with the edge seemingly favoring the women? Research conducted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem would seem to indicate that the answer to both questions is yes. Some people appear to be resilient to difficult conditions, whereas others react adversely to such challenges, incurring a range of physical and...

2009-02-09 07:13:22

UC San Diego study in animals may pave way for novel approach to treating Alzheimer's disease Memory loss, cognitive impairment, brain cell degeneration and cell death were prevented or reversed in several animal models after treatment with a naturally occurring protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The study by a University of California, San Diego-led team "“ published in the February 8, 2009 issue of Nature Medicine "“ shows that BDNF treatment can...

2009-02-05 09:18:41

Alcoholics who have a hard time staying on the wagon might be able to chalk it up to their genes. Working with colleagues in the U.S., Polish researchers have identified a genetic mutation they believe puts people at a greater risk for relapse after treatment for alcohol dependency. The gene was found in a study involving 123 people taking part in addiction treatment programs in Poland. All were assessed for severity of alcohol use and other factors related to alcoholism, such as depression...

2009-02-02 13:15:00

Weill Cornell Medical College study could lead to better understanding of memory formation New research sheds light on a neural growth factor called proBDNF, finding that it is present and potentially active during the perinatal period when the brain's circuitry and memory-encoding regions are being refined. Led by Weill Cornell Medical College investigators with those at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), and reported in the Jan....

2009-01-09 08:58:40

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's School of Dentistry (www.ohsu.edu/sod) have discovered that the nerve cells controlling heart rate and blood pressure synthesize a molecule known to be critically important for proper nervous system growth. The finding could someday play a significant role in the prevention of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and high blood pressure. According to the National Institutes of Health, SIDS is the leading cause of death in children between...

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2008-10-09 12:15:00

Scientists reported on Wednesday that the brain can produce antidepressants with the right kind of signal, a finding that suggests that meditating, or going to your "happy place," truly works. Researchers discovered lab mice forced to swim endlessly until they surrendered and just floated, waiting to drown, could be conditioned to regain their will to live when a tone they associated with safety was played. Dr. Eric Kandel of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Columbia University in New...

2008-08-28 06:00:56

By Nanci Hellmich Some obese children and adults who eat excessively may be missing a gene for a brain chemical involved in controlling appetite, according to a study in today's New England Journal of Medicine. Low levels of the chemical are also linked to long-term memory loss and difficulties in sensing pain. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health examined 33 children and adults with a rare condition in which groups of genes have been deleted. Called WAGR syndrome, the...

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2008-07-09 18:05:00

In addition to helping protect us from heart disease and cancer, a balanced diet and regular exercise can also protect the brain and ward off mental disorders. "Food is like a pharmaceutical compound that affects the brain," said Fernando G³mez-Pinilla, a UCLA professor of neurosurgery and physiological science who has spent years studying the effects of food, exercise and sleep on the brain. "Diet, exercise and sleep have the potential to alter our brain health and mental function. This...

2006-04-05 14:30:00

By Karla Gale SAN DIEGO - Daily testosterone treatment of men with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) -- the most common form of the disease in which symptoms wax and wane -- appears to be neuroprotective while improving their brain function. That's according to research presented this week at the American Academy of Neurology 58th Annual Meeting here. "Men are less likely to get MS, and they tend to be older when they do," presenter Dr. Nancy Sicotte told Reuters Health. "So our...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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