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Latest Brandeis University Stories

2010-10-05 09:00:00

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Oct. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- OHO Interactive (www.OHO.com) and Brandeis University (www.Brandeis.edu) today announced the launch of the new BrandeisNOW, (www.Brandeis.edu/now), a robust campus news site for Brandeis University faculty, staff and students, as well as for alumni, parents and media. With the goals of improving the user experience and proactively promoting timely information on news and events, Brandeis chose OHO Interactive to design a site that could meet a broad...

2010-07-16 13:34:27

Current economic crisis finds few bright spots in mental health spending As the current global economic crisis drives up the demand for mental health care services, cash-strapped agencies are slashing mental health budgets, according to a new Brandeis University study out this month in the International Journal of Mental Health. However, while most nations are cutting spending, a handful of countries are earmarking funding to meet the anticipated growth in mental health problems. In the U.S.,...

2010-07-02 19:54:28

Brandeis lab reveals the connection between mutation and malignancy What if we could understand why cancer develops? We know that certain risk factors, such as smoking or excessive sun exposure, can increase the chances of developing this terrible disease, but cancer can form in any tissue, and the cause is not always clear. One idea that has emerged is that for a cell to transform into a cancer cell it must suffer a large number of mutations affecting different genes needed to control cell...

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2010-05-18 07:52:48

Medicalization of human problems is a growth industry -- but what does it cost? Menopause. Normal pregnancy. Infertility. ADHD. Erectile dysfunction. Over the last several decades, these conditions have come to be defined and treated as medical problems. They've been "medicalized." In the first study of its kind in the current issue of Social Science and Medicine, Brandeis researchers used national data to estimate the costs of these and a handful of other common conditions on escalating U.S....

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2010-05-13 09:25:38

First large-scale formal quantitative test confirms Darwin's theory of universal common ancestry More than 150 years ago, Darwin proposed the theory of universal common ancestry (UCA), linking all forms of life by a shared genetic heritage from single-celled microorganisms to humans. Until now, the theory that makes ladybugs, oak trees, champagne yeast and humans distant relatives has remained beyond the scope of a formal test. This week, a Brandeis biochemist reports in Nature the results of...

2010-03-17 16:32:42

Nature study reports that the molecular basis of detecting tissue-damaging chemicals goes back more 500 million years Waltham, MA -- Whenever you choke on acrid cigarette smoke, feel like you're burning up from a mouthful of wasabi-laced sushi, or cry while cutting raw onions and garlic, your response is being triggered by a primordial chemical sensor conserved across some 500 million years of animal evolution, report Brandeis University scientists in a study in Nature this week. Chemical...

2010-03-04 08:35:00

Waltham, MA -- Despite the loss of the Democrats' supermajority necessary to pass comprehensive national healthcare reform, new federal legislation is needed to promote greater efficiency in the medical delivery system. Comprehensive reform of Medicare's provider-payment system would accelerate delivery system change but would be highly disruptive for many hospitals and physicians. However, congressional proposals that provide new authority for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid...

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2010-02-18 12:55:00

Life's smallest motor, a protein that shuttles cargo within cells and helps cells divide, does so by rocking up and down like a seesaw, according to research conducted by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Brandeis University. The researchers created high-resolution snapshots of a protein motor, called kinesin, as it walked along a microtubule, which are tube-shaped structures that form a cell's "skeleton." The result is the closest look...

2010-01-11 16:28:54

Cognitively stimulating activities are beneficial, but evidence suggests mental exercises help some more than others If you don't have a college degree, you're at greater risk of developing memory problems or even Alzheimer's. Education plays a key role in lifelong memory performance and risk for dementia, and it's well documented that those with a college degree possess a cognitive advantage over their less educated counterparts in middle and old age. Now, a large national study from...

2009-12-23 09:03:19

As anyone suffering through a head cold knows, food tastes wrong when the nose is clogged, an experience that leads many to conclude that the sense of taste operates normally only when the olfactory system is also in good working order. Evidence that the taste system influences olfactory perception, however, has been vanishingly rare"”until now. In a novel study this week in Nature Neuroscience, Brandeis researchers report just such an influence. Neuroscientist Don Katz and colleagues...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.