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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 11:53 EDT

Latest BRCA2 Stories

2006-06-26 18:20:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - X-rays may greatly raise the risk of breast cancer in women who are genetically susceptible to the disease, researchers reported on Monday. A study of women with genetic mutations known to cause breast cancer showed that having a chest X-ray could double or even triple that risk. The findings are not clear-cut and not clear what kind of chest X-rays pose the greater risk, said Dr. David Goldgar of the University of Utah...

2006-06-19 19:26:24

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Researchers have found another breast cancer gene that can greatly raise the risk of the disease in women of European heritage, according to a report published on Monday. They said the gene worked in tandem with the well-known BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to raise the risk of breast cancer by as much as 80 percent. The team, at Iceland's Decode Genetics, said their findings suggest women with certain mutations in two of...

2006-05-23 17:10:58

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Detecting breast cancer with sensitive magnetic resonance imaging is expensive but worth it for women who carry a gene mutation that puts them at higher risk for the disease, a study said on Tuesday. Though rare, the inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer by as much as 80 percent. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) costs 10 times more than mammography but is capable of detecting hard-to-find tumors, such as...

2006-05-23 17:10:00

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Detecting breast cancer with sensitive magnetic resonance imaging is expensive but worth it for women who carry a gene mutation that puts them at higher risk for the disease, a study said on Tuesday. Though rare, the inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer by as much as 80 percent. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) costs 10 times more than mammography but is capable of detecting hard-to-find tumors, such as those under...

2006-04-27 07:38:47

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Prior pregnancy is associated with a reduced the risk of breast cancer in women older than 40 years who are carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations -- which are known to increase the likelihood of developing the disease -- according to a report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Previous studies have shown an association between a reduced risk of breast cancer and prior pregnancy, young age at first childbirth, and breastfeeding in the general...

2006-03-22 14:55:00

By Karla Gale NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Commercial genetic testing does not detect all of the cancer-associated inherited mutations in women with an extensive family history of breast or ovarian cancer, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Women who were familial breast cancer patients were being commercially tested for inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, and a very large number had reports returned that said they had negative results," Dr....

2006-03-22 12:18:53

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Exposure to the among of radiation produced by mammography does not substantially increase the risk of breast cancer in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, even when screening begins at an early age, investigators report in The Lancet Oncology, published online on March 22. Because BRCA mutations disrupt the repair of DNA damage, it was feared that DNA-damaging radiation from mammography would increase these patients' risk. Dr. Steven A. Narod,...

2006-01-03 14:26:20

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women with BRCA1 gene mutations, which confer a high risk of developing breast cancer, might decrease their risk by drinking a lot of coffee, according to a multicenter team of investigators. Dr. Steven A. Narod, of the University of Toronto, Ontario, and colleagues examined the association between coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer among 1690 high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The study included women from 40 clinical centers in...

2006-01-03 14:25:00

NEW YORK -- Women with BRCA1 gene mutations, which confer a high risk of developing breast cancer, might decrease their risk by drinking a lot of coffee, according to a multicenter team of investigators. Dr. Steven A. Narod, of the University of Toronto, Ontario, and colleagues examined the association between coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer among 1690 high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The study included women from 40 clinical centers in four countries. A...

2005-10-18 21:42:31

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Genetic mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes -- BRCA1 and BRCA2 -- occur with "appreciable frequency" in African-American women with a family history of the disease, with more than one quarter testing positive for a mutation in one of these genes that indicates high risk, a study shows. This finding supports genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA1 mutations in high-risk African American families, study investigators report in...