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Latest Breast cancer screening Stories

2012-02-24 06:20:04

(Ivanhoe Newswire)-- Discovering breast cancer can be devastating to women, but discovering it through mammography may give them a better chance of survival. Based on a study of almost 2,000 breast cancer patients, researchers at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle say that, in women between the ages of 40 and 49, breast cancers detected by mammography have a better prognosis. "In our study, women aged 40 to 49 whose breast cancer was detected by mammography were easier to treat and...

2012-02-23 23:00:00

Hoag Offers Breakthrough Cancer Screening and Detection Technology for Women Irvine, CA (PRWEB) February 23, 2012 Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian has expanded its world-class breast center in Newport Beach with the opening of a satellite center in the Woodbridge community of Irvine, further enhancing its status as the largest and most state-of-the-art facility of its kind in Southern California. The new Hoag Imaging and Breast Center in Hoag Health Center Woodbridge, on Barranca...

2012-02-15 23:03:57

A recent study conducted by researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., has found that female cancer survivors receiving screening mammography have "worse health behaviors" than women receiving mammography screening and who had never had cancer. Researchers surveyed 19,948 women age 35 and older presenting for screening mammography with no prior breast cancer and compared their responses of 2,713 cancer survivors, also receiving screening...

2012-02-07 06:58:02

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Recent clinical guidelines recommend against routine ovarian cancer screening because incidence of ovarian cancer is low, there is no proof that screening affects mortality rates, and screening tests have low positive predictive values and high false-positive rates. However, a recent survey has shown that physicians continue to routinely screen women for ovarian cancer that leads to unnecessary and expensive follow up tests or procedures. Researchers surveyed 3,200...

2012-02-06 15:33:48

Feb. 4 was World Cancer Day A new study analyses the influence that certain birth and infancy characteristics have on mammographic density — an important indicator of breast cancer risk. The results reveal that women born to mothers aged over 39 years and women who were taller and thinner than the average girl prior to puberty have a higher breast density. This brings with it an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Although the role that mammographic density plays in breast...

2012-02-01 01:08:53

A study of 64,659 women, recently published in the journal Academic Radiology, found that while 1,246 of these women were at high enough breast cancer risk to recommend additional screening with MRI, only 173 of these women returned to the clinic within a year for the additional screening. “It´s hard to tell where, exactly, is the disconnect,” says Deborah Glueck, PhD, investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and associate professor of biostatistics and...

2012-01-09 12:11:20

A new study has found that when parents get tested for breast cancer genes, many of them share their results with their children, even with those who are very young. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also revealed that most parents think that their children are not distressed when they learn about the test results. For parents, one of the primary motivations for getting tested for hereditary cancer genes is to better...

2011-12-13 06:35:31

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- For years, mammograms have been the best way to find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. But a new study in the UK suggests that since the introduction of the test in the country, things such as false positives and overtreatments are becoming more common. In 1986, the Forrest Report recommended the introduction of a National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) offering three yearly...

2011-12-09 16:06:57

Research: Possible net harms of breast cancer screening: Updated modeling of Forrest report A new study published on bmj.com today supports the claim that the introduction of breast cancer screening in the UK may have caused more harm than good. Harms included false positives (abnormal results that turn out to be normal) and overtreatment (treatment of harmless cancers that would never have caused symptoms or death during a patient's lifetime). This may be because the cancer grows so...


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bibliopole
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