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Latest Breeding Stories

2012-12-22 05:04:51

The Dog Help Network has some tips and advice on how to identify the first symptoms of ear problems, and how to avoid them all together. (PRWEB) December 21, 2012 Nothing can put a damper on the holidays like a dog ear infection. They´re very uncomfortable for a dog, they smell bad, and can turn a serious condition. The Dog Help Network has some tips and advice on how to identify the first symptoms of ear problems, and how to avoid them all together. It´s especially important to...

Corn Has Many Active Genes, Could Produce High Yield
2012-12-03 11:45:34

University of Bonn Researchers at the University of Bonn investigate 1 of the oldest mysteries of plant breeding Hybrid plants provide much higher yield than their homozygous parents. Plant breeders have known this for more than 100 years and used this effect called heterosis for richer harvests. Until now, science has puzzled over the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon. Researchers at the University of Bonn and partners from Tübingen and the USA have now...


Latest Breeding Reference Libraries

Mulefoot
2014-08-28 08:52:56

The mulefoot is a breed of domestic pig that originated in Spain, although its exact origins are unknown. It is likely that the breed descended from hogs that were brought to the Gulf Coast of Spain and although pigs with non-cloven hooves have been known since the time of Aristotle, this is the only one to be considered a breed. This is due to its established standard and use in agriculture. The stock in America that was descended from Spanish lines was managed by selective breeding until...

Large Black
2014-08-28 08:46:32

The large black, also known as the Cornwall black or the Devon black, is a breed of domestic pig that was developed in Great Britain. The breed was a result of crossing black colored pigs from the southwestern areas of Cornwall and Devon and the eastern areas of Suffolk, Kent, and Essex. The pigs taken from Devon were chosen for their physical traits, but selective breeding changed their constitution and confirmation, giving them a standard size and appearance. This breed grew in popularity...

Cumberland Pig
2014-08-15 11:16:52

The Cumberland pig is a breed of domestic pig that was developed in Northern areas of England. It was once used for the meat industry, specifically for use in local delicacies like Cumberland ham or sausage, but it went extinct in 1960 after leaner meat became popular. It is thought that the breed was developed the course of a few hundred years in Westmorland and Cumberland. It was a close relative of the Old Yorkshire pig and had a heavy build that helped it withstand the harsh weather in...

Thoroughbred
2014-08-12 13:54:44

The Thoroughbred is a breed of horse that was developed in England during the reigns of King Charles II, King William III, Queen Anne, and King George I. The foundation stallions of the breed, two Arabians and one unknown breed, were imported in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, and although nearly 160 Oriental stallions were used in its development, these three horses were the most prominent. These were bred to native mares from various breed, including the Irish Hobby,...

Tennessee Walking Horse
2014-08-12 13:49:36

The Tennessee walking horse, also known as the Tennessee walker, is a breed of gaited horse that was developed in the state of Tennessee in America. It was developed in 1790, when Canadian pacers and Narragansett Pacers were crossbred with American mustangs. The resulting horse was one with a smooth gait that was able to perform variety of tasks. Later, other breeds were introduced into the bloodline including Morgan horses, Thoroughbred horses, and American saddlebred horses. The foundation...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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