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Latest Bronze Age Stories

Climate Change Responsible For Indus Decline
2012-05-29 13:01:31

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com New research has shed a light on an ancient Asian civilization and given a glimpse into what the future might hold for the region. Climate change is now thought to be responsible for the decline of the Indus civilization, an empire that stretched over more than a million square kilometers. One of the first great urban cultures that also included Egypt and Mesopotamia, its people lived primarily along rivers from the Arabian Sea to the Ganges, over what is...

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2011-12-05 06:56:08

Hundreds of intact artifacts recovered from the Cambridgeshire Fens in eastern England have provided scientists with new insight as to how Bronze Age men and women lived their lives on a day-to-day basis, according to UK media reports published over the weekend. According to the Daily Mail, the discovery is "the largest collection ever found in one place in Britain" includes a variety of roughly 3,000 year old items, including wicker baskets, wooden sword handles, textile fragments, and...

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2011-06-21 09:58:27

By Amanda Chalifoux, University of Cincinnati A recent find by a University of Cincinnati archeologist suggests an ancient Cypriot city was well protected from outside threats.  That research, by UC's Gisela Walberg, professor of classics, will be presented at the annual workshop of the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Center in Nicosia, Cyprus, on June 25, 2011. Since 2001, Walberg has worked in modern Cyprus to uncover the ancient city of Bamboula, a Bronze Age city that was an...

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2011-02-07 14:41:26

Play was a central element of people's lives as far back as 4,000 years ago. This has been revealed by an archaeology thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, which investigates the social significance of the phenomenon of play and games in the Bronze Age Indus Valley in present-day Pakistan. It is not uncommon for archaeologists excavating old settlements to come across play and game-related finds, but within established archaeology these types of finds have often been disregarded....

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2010-10-12 06:10:00

Researchers said Monday that traces of a previously unknown Bronze Age civilization have been discovered in the peaks of Russia's Caucasus Mountains because of aerial photographs taken 40 years ago. "We have discovered a civilization dating from the 16th to the 14th centuries BC, high in the mountains south of Kislovodsk," in Russia's North Caucasus region, Andrei Belinsky, the head of a joint Russian-German expedition that has been investigating the region for five years, told AFP. He said...

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2010-09-29 06:10:00

Chemical tests on teeth from an ancient burial site containing the 3,550-year-old remains of a teenage boy wearing a unique necklace unearthed near Stonehenge indicate that the person buried there grew up around the Mediterranean Sea. The conclusions come from analysis of different forms of oxygen and strontium in the tooth enamel of the remains. A previous skeleton unearthed near Stonehenge was analyzed and was found to also be a migrant to the area. The "Boy with the Amber Necklace," as...

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2010-07-01 09:28:45

A 3,200-year-old round bronze tablet with a carved face of a woman, found at the El-ahwat excavation site near Katzir in central Israel, is part of a linchpin that held the wheel of a battle chariot in place. This was revealed by scientist Oren Cohen of the Zinman Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa. "Such an identification reinforces the claim that a high-ranking Egyptian or local ruler was based at this location, and is likely to support the theory that the site is Harosheth...

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2009-10-17 08:53:48

Archaeologists surveying the world's oldest submerged town have found ceramics dating back to the Final Neolithic. Their discovery suggests that Pavlopetri, off the southern Laconia coast of Greece, was occupied some 5,000 years ago "” at least 1,200 years earlier than originally thought. These remarkable findings have been made public by the Greek government after the start of a five year collaborative project involving the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities of the Hellenic Ministry of...

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2009-09-22 12:36:04

A leading German professor said on Tuesday that archaeologists in the ancient city of Troy in Turkey found the remains of a man and a woman believed to have died in 1,200 B.C., the time of the legendary war chronicled by Homer, Reuters reported. The bodies were found near a defense line within the city built in the late Bronze age, according to Ernst Pernicka, a University of Tubingen professor of archaeometry who is leading excavations on the site in northwestern Turkey. Experts say the...

2009-08-11 20:28:53

A gold-banded dagger still wrapped in an animal-skin sheath was found in a grave dating from the early Bronze Age, Scottish archaeologists said Tuesday. Kenneth Brophy of the University of Glasgow said archaeologists were even more amazed by other objects in the grave, The Scotsman reported. These were organic materials preserved for 4,000 to 5,000 years, including a wooden bowl, a skin bag and bits of bark and remains of plants. The high quality of preservation is of exceptional importance...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'