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Latest Brown University Stories

2014-02-25 23:03:30

Rhode Island Medical Imaging (RIMI) once again donated $2,500 to support the Providence College Women’s Basketball Program’s fight to end breast cancer. East Providence, RI (PRWEB) February 25, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Imaging (RIMI) was pleased to once again donate $2,500 to support the Providence College (PC) Women’s Basketball Program’s fight to end breast cancer. The donation covered the purchase of the ‘Pink Out Friartown’ uniforms, which were worn during the February...

Forest Model Predicts How Trees Compete For Canopy Space
2014-02-20 11:53:17

Brown University Out of an effort to account for what seemed in airborne images to be unusually large tree growth in a Hawaiian forest, scientists at Brown University and the Carnegie Institution for Science have developed a new mathematical model that predicts how trees compete for space in the canopy. What their model revealed for this particular forest of hardy native Metrosideros polymorpha trees on the windward slope of Manua Kea, is that an incumbent tree limb greening up a given...

New Boron Nanomaterial Could Be A Very Real Possibility
2014-01-28 10:55:00

Brown University Graphene, a sheet of carbon one atom thick, may soon have a new nanomaterial partner. In the lab and on supercomputers, chemical engineers have determined that a unique arrangement of 36 boron atoms in a flat disc with a hexagonal hole in the middle may be the preferred building blocks for “borophene.” Findings are reported in Nature Communications. Researchers from Brown University have shown experimentally that a boron-based competitor to graphene is a very real...

Photos And Lab Analysis Needed For Leaf Study
2014-01-23 15:27:34

Brown University Automated remote photography is a convenient, labor-saving research tool for tracking leaf function and doing forest research. But does photography mirror what's actually happening on the ground? A new study finds photography accurately tracks the timing of red pigments in the fall, but the timing of green in the spring and summer — not so much. Every picture tells a story, but the story digital photos tell about how forests respond to climate change could be...

2014-01-20 09:42:42

A new class of molecules called acyldepsipeptides — ADEPs — may provide a new way to attack bacteria that have developed resistance to antibiotics. Researchers at Brown and MIT have discovered a way to increase the potency of ADEPs by up to 1,200 times. Their findings appear in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. As concerns about bacterial resistance to antibiotics grow, researchers are racing to find new kinds of drugs to replace ones that are no longer effective. One...

Cilia Use Different Molecular Motors For Different Jobs
2014-01-11 08:19:58

Brown University Cilia are one of nature’s great multipurpose tools. The tiny, hair-like fibers protrude from cell membranes and perform all kinds of tasks in all kinds of creatures, from helping clear debris from human lungs to enabling single-celled organisms to swim. Now, physicists from Brown University have discovered something that could help scientists understand how cilia have been adapted for so many varied tasks. The study, led by graduate student Ilyong Jung, looked at the...

Brown University
2014-01-06 08:12:29

Brown University Mating and meiosis – the specialized cell division that reduces the number of chromosomes in a cell – are related, but in most yeasts they are regulated separately. Not so in Candida lusitaniae, where the two programs work in unison, according to a new study in Nature. Comparison with other species suggests that this fusion may support C. lusitaniae’s “haploid lifestyle” of maintaining only one set of chromosomes in each cell. From a biological point of view,...

Parasitic DNA Multiplies In Aging Tissues
2013-12-22 17:19:18

Brown University The genomes of organisms from humans to corn are replete with "parasitic" strands of DNA that, when not suppressed, copy themselves and spread throughout the genome, potentially affecting health. Earlier this year Brown University researchers found that these "retrotransposable elements" were increasingly able to break free of the genome's control in cultures of human cells. Now in a new paper in the journal Aging, they show that RTEs are increasingly able to break free...

2013-12-18 23:01:33

Technique Allows for Non-Invasive Liver Analysis and Improved Patient Outcomes East Providence, RI (PRWEB) December 18, 2013 Rhode Island Medical Imaging (RIMI) has expanded its wide-range of diagnostic services to now include liver elastography. This non-invasive procedure has proven successful for assessing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, with virtually no patient risk. RIMI is currently the only out-patient imaging center to offer liver elastography, and it is not yet available at local...

Neuroscience Method Of Optogenetics As Good As Electrical Stimulation
2013-12-12 17:27:06

Brown University Neuroscientists are eagerly, but not always successfully, looking for proof that optogenetics – a celebrated technique that uses pulses of visible light to genetically alter brain cells to be excited or silenced – can be as successful in complex and large brains as it has been in rodent models. A new study in the journal Current Biology may be the most definitive demonstration yet that the technique can work in nonhuman primates as well as, or even a little better...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.