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Latest Brownian motion Stories

Motorized Microscopic Matchsticks Move In Water With Sense Of Direction
2013-09-10 12:11:39

University of Warwick Chemists, physicists and computer scientists at the University of Warwick have come together to devise a new powerful and very versatile way of controlling the speed and direction of motion of microscopic structures in water using what they have dubbed chemically ‘motorized microscopic matchsticks’. Before now most research seeking to influence the direction of motion of microscopic components have had to use outside influences such as a magnetic field or the...

Far-reaching Problem In Computer Simulations Deciphered By Scientists
2013-01-03 12:19:27

DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Because modern computers have to depict the real world with digital representations of numbers instead of physical analogues, to simulate the continuous passage of time they have to digitize time into small slices. This kind of simulation is essential in disciplines from medical and biological research, to new materials, to fundamental considerations of quantum mechanics, and the fact that it inevitably introduces errors is an ongoing problem for...

2011-01-26 12:06:56

There is considerable interest in understanding transport and information pathways in living cells. It is crucial for both the transport of, for example, medicine into cells, the regulation of cell life processes and their signalling with their environment. New research in biophysics at the Niels Bohr Institute shows surprisingly that the transport mechanisms do not follow the expected pattern. The results have been published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters. The researchers...

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2010-10-12 12:08:47

Using large-scale computer simulations, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have identified the most important factors affecting how molecules move through the crowded environment inside living cells. The findings suggest that perturbations caused by hydrodynamic interactions "“ similar to what happens when the wake from a large boat affects smaller boats on a lake "“ may be the most important factor in this intracellular diffusion. A detailed understanding of the...

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2010-05-21 08:37:42

A century after Albert Einstein said we would never be able to observe the instantaneous velocity of tiny particles as they randomly shake and shimmy, so called Brownian motion, physicist Mark Raizen and his group have done so. "This is the first observation of the instantaneous velocity of a Brownian particle," says Raizen, the Sid W. Richardson Foundation Regents Chair and professor of physics at The University of Texas at Austin. "It's a prediction of Einstein's that has been standing...

2009-07-27 16:17:19

Microscopic objects floating in fluids move great distances at times, not just in a bell curve, disputing an Einstein theory, a U.S. university study suggests. The University of Illinois findings, to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences next week, raise fundamental questions concerning the statistical nature of the diffusion process, critical to drug delivery, water purification and the normal operation of living cells, engineering professor Steve Granick said....

2009-04-29 15:33:00

PITTSBURGH, April 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- High school and undergraduate students now have a ringside seat to watch atoms and molecules in super-slow motion and vivid color, as they jostle and bump each other within the cozy environs of a human cell or a beaker on a lab bench. In "Big Numbers in Small Spaces: Simulating Atoms, Molecules and Brownian Motion," students are invited to consider how many molecules are in a single drop of water, or a single cell, and then to fly in and find...

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2008-11-20 11:07:15

Brown University physicists have completed the most detailed study of the swimming patterns of a microbe, showing for the first time how its movement is affected by drag and a phenomenon called Brownian motion. The findings appear online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Imagine yourself swimming in a pool: It's the movement of your arms and legs, not the viscosity of the water, that mostly dictates the speed and direction that you swim. For tiny organisms, the...

2005-10-11 13:56:32

Lausanne, Switzerland-- An international group of researchers from the EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique F©d©rale de Lausanne), the University of Texas at Austin and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany have demonstrated that Brownian motion of a single particle behaves differently than Einstein postulated one century ago. Their results, to be published online October 11 in Physical Review Letters, provide direct physical evidence that validates a corrected form...

2005-09-07 15:55:00

A major advance in nanotechnology with far-reaching potential benefits in medicine and other fields is to be announced at this year's BA Festival of Science in Dublin. Scientists have built molecules that can, for the first time ever, move larger-than-atom-sized objects. Constructing molecular machines capable of performing relatively large-scale mechanical tasks has never been achieved before. Now, in an unprecedented breakthrough, chemists at Edinburgh University have used light to...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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