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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 17:30 EDT

Latest Bryan Fry Stories

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2010-07-22 09:40:00

Four never before discovered species of octopus--as well as venom that remains effective at sub-zero temperatures--have been located by researchers, according to a Wednesday press release from the University of Melbourne. An international team of researchers, including experts from the University of Melbourne, the Norwegian University of Technology and Science and the University of Hamburg, are responsible for the discovery--which, according to the press release could wind up "significantly...

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2009-05-19 13:44:50

Australian researchers have discovered what makes the Komodo dragon's bite so deadly for its prey. Scientists previously considered that the world's largest lizard's mouth held deadly bacteria that stopped its victims' blood from clotting. Walter Auffenberg put that theory forward in 1981. But lead researcher Bryan Fry used magnetic resonance imagery to show that the deadly lizard packs a venomous bite, as seen through its venom gland with ducts that lead to their teeth. Fry used 3-D computer...

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2009-04-15 13:02:31

Once thought to be only the realm of the blue-ringed octopus, researchers have now shown that all octopuses and cuttlefish, and some squid are venomous. The work indicates that they all share a common, ancient venomous ancestor and highlights new avenues for drug discovery. Conducted by scientists from the University of Melbourne, University of Brussels and Museum Victoria, the study was published in the Journal of Molecular Evolution. Dr Bryan Fry from the Department of Biochemistry at the...

2005-11-16 13:00:00

By Wendel Broere LEIDEN, Netherlands -- More lizard families than previously believed are venomous, including several species that are popular pets, scientists said on Wednesday. Until now, pain and swelling from lizard bites assumed to be non-venomous were attributed to the bacteria that thrive on bits of meat left between their teeth from their scavenging diet. However, the symptoms are actually from the venom, a finding which could have implications for medical research, said Dr. Bryan Fry...