Quantcast

Latest Bryan Gaensler Stories

First High-Resolution Radio Images Of Supernova 1987A Released
2013-04-02 06:25:15

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An observation of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in February of 1987 left astronomers thinking they had discovered the beginnings of a new star. However, what they had witnessed was the end of one of the brightest supernovae seen from Earth since the invention of the telescope some 400 years earlier. And in the two-plus decades since the discovery of the remnant Supernova 1987A, researchers have continued their gaze on one of the...

IMAGE: Remnant Of An Explosion With A Powerful Kick?
2012-02-02 13:47:04

Vital clues about the devastating ends to the lives of massive stars can be found by studying the aftermath of their explosions. In its more than twelve years of science operations, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has studied many of these supernova remnants sprinkled across the Galaxy. The latest example of this important investigation is Chandra's new image of the supernova remnant known as G350.1+0.3. This stellar debris field is located some 14,700 light years from the Earth toward...

bb24e09c4edde68fb75f7461ac4d99e61
2011-04-14 07:50:00

Like looking for Easter eggs in a lawn of long grass, the hunt for the Milky Way's most massive stars takes persistence and sharp eyes. In their stellar search through our Galactic backyard, astronomers have used powerful telescopes sensitive to X-ray and infrared radiation to find evidence for a substantial population of X-ray emitting massive stars. This image shows infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope near the plane of the Milky Way galaxy. Both outlined boxes contain an...

2008-06-29 06:02:19

By Anonymous The voices of science were drowned out when 1000 of Australia's brightest minds discussed ideas for the nation's future. Six years ago this magazine launched conScience, an opinion column to give Australians an outlet "for expressing forthright views on national issues". The first columnist was Bryan Gaensler, a young Australian astronomer making a mark with his discoveries from his base at Harvard University. Under the headline "Time for Scientists to Rock the Boat",...

73fdff22931c7c8ff1ffac573311513e
2008-06-10 09:25:00

ESA's orbiting X-ray observatory XMM-Newton has re-discovered an ignored celestial gem. The object in question is one of the youngest and brightest supernova remnants in the Milky Way, the corpse of a star that exploded around 1000 years ago.Its shape, age and chemical composition will allow astronomers to better understand the violent ways in which stars end their lives.Exploding stars seed the Universe with heavy chemical elements necessary to build planets and create life. The expanding...

66724636e3962ae4e9b9b0198c0c5e561
2005-02-18 13:55:00

NASA -- Scientists have detected a flash of light from across the Galaxy so powerful that it bounced off the Moon and lit up the Earth's upper atmosphere. The flash was brighter than anything ever detected from beyond our Solar System and lasted over a tenth of a second. NASA and European satellites and many radio telescopes detected the flash and its aftermath on December 27, 2004. Two science teams report about this event at a special press event today at NASA headquarters. A multitude of...

d3b86913244146552cc5e53b7e7ce8f71
2005-01-28 11:10:00

Cambridge, MA -- Astronomy is a science of extremes--the biggest, the hottest, and the most massive. Today, astrophysicist Bryan Gaensler (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and colleagues announced that they have linked two of astronomy's extremes, showing that some of the biggest stars in the cosmos become the strongest magnets when they die. "The source of these very powerful magnetic objects has been a mystery since the first one was discovered in 1998. Now, we think we have...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.