Quantcast

Latest Buck Institute for Age Research Stories

2011-06-24 22:55:46

Buck Institute research in mice moves into preclinical stage; working toward human trials Lithium profoundly prevents the aggregation of toxic proteins and cell loss associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a mouse model of the condition. Preclinical research is now underway at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging to determine correct dosages for a drug that continues to be the gold standard for the treatment of bipolar disorder. The Buck is currently working toward initiating a Phase...

2011-03-30 17:15:19

Basic Yellow 1 profoundly extends lifespan in healthy nematodes, and slows Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in worms Basic Yellow 1, a dye used in neuroscience laboratories around the world to detect damaged protein in Alzheimer's disease, is a wonder drug for nematode worms. In a study appearing in the March 30, online edition of Nature, the dye, also known as Thioflavin T, (ThT) extended lifespan in healthy nematode worms by more than 50 percent and slowed the disease process in worms...

2010-09-08 01:09:23

Buck Institute study says it's about translation, not just transcription Researchers at the Buck Institute for Age Research have discovered a novel way in which insulin affects cell metabolism and cell survival. Surprisingly the insulin signaling pathway, which is involved in aging, diabetes and stress response, is active at a deeper level of cell activity than scientists expected. The study appears in the September 8th issue of Cell Metabolism. Insulin is vitally involved in many cell...

2010-04-12 15:06:57

Rodent study highlights need for human clinical trials of drugs shown to increase growth of new neurons A study at the Buck Institute for Age Research suggests a new strategy for the treatment of stroke. Research in rodents shows the growth of new neurons, also known as neurogenesis, lessens the severity of stroke and dramatically improves function following a stroke. The research suggests that drugs shown to promote neurogenesis in rodents could have benefits for human stroke victims and...

2010-02-10 07:24:58

Research spearheaded at Buck Institute results in a web-based tool available to other scientists It is widely known that genetic mutations cause disease. What are largely unknown are the mechanisms by which these mutations wreak havoc at the molecular level, giving rise to clinically observable symptoms in patients. Now a new study using bioinformatics, led by scientists at the Buck Institute for Age Research, reports the ability to predict the molecular cause of many inherited genetic...

2009-10-02 08:26:29

Diet boosts mitochondrial function, has implications for humans Flies fed an "anti-Atkins" low protein diet live longer because their mitochondria function better. The research, done at the Buck Institute for Age Research, shows that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the lifespan extension in the flies have important implications for human aging and diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cancer. The findings, which appear in the October 2 edition of Cell, also provide a new level of...

2009-07-13 13:35:00

When cells experiencing DNA damage fail to repair themselves, they send a signal to their neighbors letting them know they're in trouble. The discovery, which shows that a process dubbed the DDR (DNA Damage Response) also controls communication from cell to cell, has implications for both cancer and aging. The findings appear in the July 13 online edition of the Nature Cell Biology.When a cell experiences DNA damage, its first response is to try to repair the damage. If that doesn't work the...

2009-03-13 07:00:00

SALT LAKE CITY, March 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Prolexys Pharmaceuticals announced today the publication of the discovery of genes that are likely to have a role in the aging process of humans. The findings result from research on the human equivalents of proteins from simple animals which confer long life in those species. The evidence suggests that these proteins are more likely to interact with other proteins in a large atlas of mapped interactions. Furthermore, the investigators were able to...

2008-08-07 00:00:30

By Richard Halstead, The Marin Independent Journal, Novato, Calif. Aug. 6--Mark Bell, a new graduate student at the University of Oklahoma, was one of 12 students learning how to culture human embryonic stem cells Wednesday in a gleaming new research laboratory at the Buck Institute for Age Research in Novato. Bell said he wants to explore the use of stem cells in treating Parkinson's disease. There is, however, no stem cell research being done at the University of Oklahoma, he said....

2008-07-30 18:00:54

Invitrogen Corporation (NASDAQ:IVGN), a provider of essential life science technologies for research, production and diagnostics, has licensed an engineered stem cell line from the Buck Institute for Age Research. The stem cell line is used in the study of neural cells in neurodegenerative disease. The financial terms were not disclosed. The stem cell line, called BG01 Olig2-GFP, is engineered to track the Olig2 gene, a neural lineage marker. The Olig2 gene controls a protein that...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
Related