Quantcast

Latest Burgess Shale fossils Stories

Lyrarapax unguispinus
2014-07-17 09:18:38

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 520 million years ago, during the Lower Cambrian, the world's oldest known predator lived beneath the ocean's surface. An international team of scientists has identified what they call "an exquisitely preserved" brain in the fossil of a group of animals known as anomalocaridids, or "abnormal shrimp." The researchers were surprised to find that the brain of this predator was less complex than those found in fossils of some...

Earliest Evidence Of Jaws Discovered In 500M-Year-Old Fish Fossil
2014-06-12 14:09:55

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Paleontologists working in the Canadian Rockies have uncovered the 500 million-year-old fossilized remains of a fish with jaw-like structures – the first time this feature has been seen so early in the fossil record, according to a new paper published in the journal Nature. Fish fossils from the Cambrian are very uncommon and in most cases poorly preserved. The newly discovered species, dubbed Metaspriggina, also provides evidence...

artists reconstruction of Tamisiocaris borealis
2014-03-27 09:19:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Several large marine animals have evolved from fearsome predators to become gentle giants that use filtering appendages to ingest food, and new research from a team of European researchers has revealed a similar evolution in a group of predators that roamed the oceans 520 million years ago during the Early Cambrian. According to the team’s report in the journal Nature, an early arthropod called Tamisiocaris borealis used large curly...

Canada's Kootenay National Park Home To Epic Burgess Shale Site
2014-02-12 06:38:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale found in Yoho National Park in British Columbia is home to some of the world's earliest animals, including a very primitive human relative. It is also considered to be one of the world's most important fossil sites. More than one hundred years after its discovery, a new Burgess Shale fossil site has been discovered 26 miles away in Kootenay National Park. According to Pomona College geologist...

Burgess Shale Fossil Provides Crucial Missing Link
2013-03-14 05:05:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Located in Yoho National Park, Canada's Burgess Shale fossil beds have yielded yet another major scientific discovery. Scientists from the University of Toronto, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Montreal have unearthed a strange phallus-shaped creature from the 505 million year-old rock layers. The study, published in a recent issue of Nature, confirms Spartobranchus tenuis as a member of the acorn worms group....

2013-01-03 11:04:17

Of all the famous fossil localities in the world – Mongolia´s Flaming Cliffs, Tanzania´s Olduvai Gorge, Wyoming´s Green River, Germany´s Solnhöfn Quarry – perhaps none is as widely celebrated as British Columbia´s Burgess Shale. High in the Canadian Rockies, the Burgess Shale contains some of the oldest and most exquisitely detailed fossils of early life on Earth. Visiting the Burgess Shale requires some preparation – you must hire a...

How The Mollusc Got Its Teeth Revealed By Ancient Fossils
2012-08-22 15:06:06

The radula sounds like something from a horror movie — a conveyor belt lined with hundreds of rows of interlocking teeth. In fact, radulas are found in the mouths of most molluscs, from the giant squid to the garden snail. Now, a "prototype" radula found in 500-million-year-old fossils studied by University of Toronto graduate student Martin Smith, shows that the earliest radula was not a flesh-rasping terror, but a tool for humbly scooping food from the muddy sea floor. The Cambrian...

505 Million Year Old Fossil Linked To Humans
2012-03-06 14:15:10

A team of researchers have discovered that a 505 million-year-old fossil is actually an ancient relative to humans. Researchers from the University of Cambridge, University of Toronto and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) confirmed that the extinct Pikaia gracilen found in Burgess Shale fossil beds in Canada's Yoho National Park is the most primitive form of all known vertebrates, including humans. Pikaia was first described by American paleontologist Charles Doolittle Walcott in 1911 as a...

Researchers Discover Ancient Tulip-like Creature In The Canadian Rockies
2012-01-20 07:49:18

A strange tulip-shaped creature discovered in half-a-billion-year-old rocks had a feeding system unlike any other animal, researchers reported this week. Officially named Siphusauctum gregarium, the fossils, unearthed from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rockies, reveal a peculiar creature roughly 7-8 inches long with a unique filter feeding system. The creature has a long stem with a bulbous cup-like structure -- similar to that of a tulip -- near the top that...

2012-01-19 11:19:04

University of Toronto/Royal Ontario Museum scientists discover unusual "tulip" creature A bizarre creature that lived in the ocean more than 500 million years ago has emerged from the famous Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rockies. Officially named Siphusauctum gregarium, fossils reveal a tulip-shaped creature that is about the length of a dinner knife (approximately 20 centimetres or eight inches) and has a unique filter feeding system. Siphusauctum has a long stem,...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
Related