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Latest Burgess Shale Stories

Earliest Evidence Of Jaws Discovered In 500M-Year-Old Fish Fossil
2014-06-12 14:09:55

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Paleontologists working in the Canadian Rockies have uncovered the 500 million-year-old fossilized remains of a fish with jaw-like structures – the first time this feature has been seen so early in the fossil record, according to a new paper published in the journal Nature. Fish fossils from the Cambrian are very uncommon and in most cases poorly preserved. The newly discovered species, dubbed Metaspriggina, also provides evidence...

Canada's Kootenay National Park Home To Epic Burgess Shale Site
2014-02-12 06:38:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale found in Yoho National Park in British Columbia is home to some of the world's earliest animals, including a very primitive human relative. It is also considered to be one of the world's most important fossil sites. More than one hundred years after its discovery, a new Burgess Shale fossil site has been discovered 26 miles away in Kootenay National Park. According to Pomona College geologist...

Burgess Shale Fossil Provides Crucial Missing Link
2013-03-14 05:05:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Located in Yoho National Park, Canada's Burgess Shale fossil beds have yielded yet another major scientific discovery. Scientists from the University of Toronto, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Montreal have unearthed a strange phallus-shaped creature from the 505 million year-old rock layers. The study, published in a recent issue of Nature, confirms Spartobranchus tenuis as a member of the acorn worms group....

2013-01-03 11:04:17

Of all the famous fossil localities in the world – Mongolia´s Flaming Cliffs, Tanzania´s Olduvai Gorge, Wyoming´s Green River, Germany´s Solnhöfn Quarry – perhaps none is as widely celebrated as British Columbia´s Burgess Shale. High in the Canadian Rockies, the Burgess Shale contains some of the oldest and most exquisitely detailed fossils of early life on Earth. Visiting the Burgess Shale requires some preparation – you must hire a...

2012-03-07 14:15:15

The Burgess Shale of British Columbia is arguably the most important fossil deposit in the world, providing an astounding record of the Cambrian "Explosion," the rapid flowering of complex life from single-celled ancestors. While most of the fossil record is comprised of shells, teeth and bones, the Burgess Shale preserves the softer bits–the eyes, guts, gills and other delicate structures–of animals belonging to Earth's earliest complex ecosystems a half a billion years ago. The...

Researchers Discover Ancient Tulip-like Creature In The Canadian Rockies
2012-01-20 07:49:18

A strange tulip-shaped creature discovered in half-a-billion-year-old rocks had a feeding system unlike any other animal, researchers reported this week. Officially named Siphusauctum gregarium, the fossils, unearthed from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rockies, reveal a peculiar creature roughly 7-8 inches long with a unique filter feeding system. The creature has a long stem with a bulbous cup-like structure -- similar to that of a tulip -- near the top that...

2012-01-19 11:19:04

University of Toronto/Royal Ontario Museum scientists discover unusual "tulip" creature A bizarre creature that lived in the ocean more than 500 million years ago has emerged from the famous Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rockies. Officially named Siphusauctum gregarium, fossils reveal a tulip-shaped creature that is about the length of a dinner knife (approximately 20 centimetres or eight inches) and has a unique filter feeding system. Siphusauctum has a long stem,...

2011-12-01 15:00:00

Newly launched bilingual exhibition is the worldâs leading online Burgess Shale resource Toronto, Ontario (PRWEB) December 01, 2011 Today the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and Parks Canada announced the launch of the Burgess Shale online exhibition, as part of the Virtual Museum of Canada. The website provides, for the first time ever, an immersive journey into the world of the bizarre prehistoric creatures that formed the foundation for all animal life on Earth half a billion...

Image 1 - Researchers Track Half-billion Year Old Predator
2011-11-09 08:57:09

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan and Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have followed fossilized footprints to a multi-legged predator that ruled the seas of the Cambrian period about half a billion years ago. "Short of finding an animal at the end of its trackway, it's really very rare to be able to identify the producer so confidently," said Nicholas Minter, lead author of the article on the study, which appears in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Minter...

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2010-05-14 07:24:56

Paleontologists have discovered a rich array of exceptionally preserved fossils of marine animals that lived between 480 million and 472 million years ago, during the early part of a period known as the Ordovician. The specimens are the oldest yet discovered soft-bodied fossils from the Ordovician, a period marked by intense biodiversification. The findings, which appear in the May 13 issue of the journal Nature, greatly expand our understanding of the sea creatures and ecosystems that...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'