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Latest Burmese Python Stories

Salt Water Alone Unlikely To Halt Burmese Python Invasion
2012-01-05 05:03:24

Invasive Burmese python hatchlings from the Florida Everglades can withstand exposure to salt water long enough to potentially expand their range through ocean and estuarine environments, according to research in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. This recent study, based on lab experiments conducted by researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey,   provides initial evidence that pythons may be able to survive in marine and estuarine...

2011-10-31 05:56:52

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you have a fear of snakes, hopefully this will change your mind!  According to a recent study, fatty acids circulating through feeding python bloodstreams promote healthy heart growth in the constricting snake and the results may have implications for treating human heart disease. University of Colorado Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand and her research team found the amount of triglycerides, the main constituent of natural fats and oils, in the blood of...

Pythons’ Huge Hearts Offer Insight For Human Heart Health
2011-10-28 05:34:09

While many people think of snakes as creepy, cold-hearted creatures that swallow their prey whole. But it turns out the reptiles actually have enormous hearts that could offer clues to treating people with cardiac disease, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder reported on Thursday. The surprising new study showed that the vast amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding Burmese pythons promote healthy heart growth. The researchers found the amount of...

2011-10-27 22:12:55

Identification of three fatty acids involved in the extreme growth of Burmese pythons' hearts following large meals could prove beneficial in treating diseased human hearts, according to research co-authored by a University of Alabama scientist and publishing in the Oct. 28 issue of Science. Growth of the human heart can be beneficial when resulting from exercise — a type of growth known as physiological cardiac hypertrophy — but damaging when triggered by disease —...

2011-10-27 22:06:29

Fatty acids circulating through feeding python bloodstreams promotes healthy heart growth in the constricting snakes A surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth, results that may have implications for treating human heart disease. CU-Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand and her research team found the amount of triglycerides -- the main constituent of natural...

2011-09-15 13:03:21

Florida has the world´s worst invasive amphibian and reptile problem, and a new 20-year study led by a University of Florida researcher verifies the pet trade as the No. 1 cause of the species´ introductions. From 1863 through 2010, 137 non-native amphibian and reptile species were introduced to Florida, with about 25 percent of those traced to one animal importer. The findings appear online today in Zootaxa. “Most people in Florida don´t realize when they see an...

2011-03-10 23:16:15

The Everglades National Park in Florida is home to hundreds of species of native wildlife. It has also become the well-established home of the non-native Burmese python"”known to be a predator of native species. Now scientists, for the first time, have conducted a detailed analysis of the avian component of the python's diet and the negative impact the snakes may have on Florida's native birds, including some endangered species. The Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), native to...

2010-03-23 08:51:00

WASHINGTON, March 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Today the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands and the Subcommittee on Insular Affairs, Oceans and Wildlife will hold a joint oversight hearing on "How To Manage Large Constrictor Snakes And Other Invasive Species." The Subcommittees will receive testimony on efforts to monitor and control Burmese Pythons and other invasive species in Everglades National Park. At the center of this debate is the US Fish & Wildlife...

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2009-11-06 14:41:42

Officials in Florida say they are seeing more invasive species of snakes entering into the warm semi-tropic climate. "Compounding their risk to native species and ecosystems is that these snakes mature early, produce large numbers of offspring, travel long distances, and have broad diets that allow them to eat most native birds and mammals," Gordon Rodda, scientist at the Fort Collins Science Center, told AFP. Rodda recently issued a report to the US Geological Survey noting that there...

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2009-10-13 15:15:00

Five giant non-native snake species would pose high risks to the health of ecosystems in the United States should they become established here, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report released today. The USGS report details the risks of nine non-native boa, anaconda and python species that are invasive or potentially invasive in the United States. Because all nine species share characteristics associated with greater risks, none was found to be a low ecological risk. Two of these...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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