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Latest Butterfly Stories

2009-01-08 16:40:00

New tires allow race cars to take tight turns at high speeds. Hind wings give moths and butterflies similar advantages: They are not necessary for basic flight but help these creatures take tight turns to evade predators."To escape a predator, you don't have to be fast, you just have to be more erratic," said Tom Eisner, a world authority on animal behavior, ecology and evolution and the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor Emeritus of Chemical Ecology at Cornell. Eisner is co-author of a study on...

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2008-12-28 14:05:00

The National Trust stated that UK wildlife is struggling to cope as erratic and unseasonal weather has taken its toll for a second consecutive year. Birds, mammals and particularly insects have all suffered from a cold, late spring, a wet summer with little sunshine and a long, dry autumn, they said. Known species under threat from the drastic weather changes include puffins, marsh fritillary butterflies and lesser horseshoe bats. Another wet summer in 2009 could also severely affect...

2008-12-27 12:17:13

Britain's puffins are among the wildlife suffering from a second year of erratic weather, the National Trust said Saturday. This year's cold spring, wet summer and dry autumn have made tough going for puffins, the marsh fritillary butterfly and lesser horseshoe bats, the BBC reported. A wet summer in 2009 could be disastrous for insects -- an integral part of the wildlife food chain, the National Trust said. Bees struggled though frost and snow in April, while birds, including blue and great...

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2008-10-13 16:10:08

Night-traveling migratory moths may hitch a ride on the wind, but a new study in the October 14th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, confirms that they are anything but drifters. A previous report also in Current Biology offered the first evidence that Silver Y moths rely on a sophisticated internal compass, sailing on favorable winds to reach their southerly winter destination within a matter of days. Now, the research team that brought us that finding reveals that the moths...

2008-10-06 00:00:20

News in brief WILDLIFE Schemes to protect natterjack toads, fritillary butterflies and sharks are to receive funding as part of a 5.5m programme to help England's most threatened wildlife. Birds, including cirl buntings and twites, will also benefit from the cash, as will wetland landscapes and marine species, Natural England said. The Government's conservation agency will also fund projects which aim to preserve traditional orchards and moves to restore hedgerows in an attempt to help...

2008-09-14 15:00:14

By ANNYSA JOHNSON Wauwatosa -- Barb Agnew remembers standing on this same spot on the Milwaukee County Grounds a few years ago, in the shade of this grand and verdant sycamore tree. She turned to the north, and there she saw them: hundreds of monarch butterflies, in a glorious cloud of orange and black, flitting up over the hill and into astand of trees. Not everyone who visits the Monarch Trail that Agnew has created on this expansive public land is treated to such a spectacular show....

2008-09-07 21:00:11

At the Oceanfront, one set of visitors arrives late in the summer and hangs around long after Labor Day. They'd be the perfect visitors to extend the tourist season, except they are birds. Called sanderlings, these buff and white critters arrive en masse in late August. Many stay all winter because they find our cold weather beaches and Oceanfront dining to their liking. These late summer arrivals that turn more pale and gray as they lose their breeding plumage are so familiar to August...

2008-09-02 00:00:12

Young people working to protect a delicate endangered butterfly have received a financial boost. The funding will help members of the British Trust for Conservation Volunteers (BTCV) charity regenerate the habitat of the pearl-bordered fritillary on Bodmin Moor. The aid is from GreenPrints, a volunteering programme that offers funding and practical support for projects that improve the environment, carried out by people aged 16 to 25. Organiser Betty Levene said: "This butterfly was...

2008-08-30 09:00:36

By Denis Cuff It was one small flight for a butterfly, but one giant leap for a species. Butterfly No. 15 emerged from her foam cup home and fluttered off into the wild in the Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Preserve on Friday morning, during the first release of endangered Lange's metalmark butterflies reared in captivity. No. 15 was one of 30 pregnant butterflies released by a team of biologists in a last-ditch effort to save the fragile orange-brown- and-white species that lives in...

2008-08-07 03:00:17

By Crable, Ad FT. INDIANTOWN GAP - It is indeed an irony of the natural world that the largest colony of the beautiful regal fritillary butterfly east of the Mississippi is on a military reservation where the earth is blasted asunder, churned up and burned over. An ancient North American species, the regal is a large reddish-orange butterfly that has been described as a monarch butterfly dipped in chocolate. A butterfly of old fields, pastures and the plains of the prairie, it was once...


Latest Butterfly Reference Libraries

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2009-04-28 15:52:13

Buddaleja utahensis is more commonly known as the Utah Butterfly Bush or the Panamint Butterfly Bushand is indigenous to the southwestern United States. Growing nearly 20 inches tall, this bristly shrub features expasive branching network with a wide circumference. Its leaves give off a silvery green color resulting from the fine hairs that cover the plant. Each leaf has a bumpy texture with sides that curl under and measures approximately 1inch. Bundles of tubular soft green flowers...

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2007-12-27 10:26:59

The Rothschild's Birdwing (Ornithoptera rothschildi), is a large butterfly from the birdwing genus endemic to the Arfak Mountains, Western New Guinea. The Rothschild's Birdwing has the most restricted distribution of all birdwings. Its preferred habitat is flowering meadows in an altitude from 6500 to 8800 feet. The females can reach a wingspan up to 6 inches. The forewings are dark brown to blackish brown with creamy white to grayish spots. The hindwings rimmed with black scales and have...

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2007-12-27 09:55:38

The Cairns Birdwing (Ornithoptera euphorion), is Australia's largest native butterfly species. Cairns Birdwings are found southwards from Mount Webb and Cooktown to Mackay in Queensland. Favored habitat is primary rainforest, although the species will breed readily in a home garden if the correct larval host plants are grown. Males have a predominately black upper wing with emerald green flashes, however the female lacks the green coloring, having a plain black upper wing with white...

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2007-12-27 09:52:26

Queen Alexandra's Birdwing (Ornithoptera alexandrae), is the largest butterfly in the world. The species was named by Lord Walter Rothschild in 1907, in honor of Queen Alexandra, wife of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. The first European to discover the species was Albert Stewart Meek in 1906, a collector employed by Lord Walter Rothschild to collect natural history specimens from Papua New Guinea. Although the first specimen was taken with the aid of a small shotgun, Meek soon...

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2005-09-12 10:40:35

The Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) is a common swallowtail butterfly found in western North America. Both the upper and lower sides of its wings are black, but the upper wing has a broad yellow stripe across it, which gives the butterfly an overall yellow appearance. Striking blue spots adorn the rear edge of the rear wing, and the characteristic tails of the swallowtails. Its wingspan is 7-9 cm and its body is somewhat shorter than the rather similar Western Tiger Swallowtail, with...

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