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Latest Butterfly Stories

Monarch Butterflies Rely On Landmarks In Order To Find Their Way
2013-04-09 12:37:42

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In an article written for redOrbit last month by Michael Harper, the overall population of the Monarch butterfly was predicted to be significantly lower than in years past. It is believed this decline is due to the combination of expanded farmlands and the steady increase in temperature in their migratory corridor. A new study, led by researchers from the University of Guelph, focused on the migratory corridor followed by these...

Expect To See Fewer Monarch Butterflies This Spring
2013-03-14 18:12:32

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Every year, hoards of Monarch butterflies begin their epic journey from Mexico through the hills of Texas to all points north, sometimes as far as Canada. Unfortunately, there will be fewer butterflies to take this journey during the coming months. It´s a trend that has been ongoing for about seven years or more and, according to Omar Vidal with the Mexican branch of the World Wildlife Fund, high temperatures and expanding...

Butterfly Evolution Can Also Be Driven By Spiders
2013-03-13 05:09:24

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Butterflies are vibrant and colorful insects, with colorations designed to deflect predators. A new study from the University of Florida reveals that some of these predator driven defenses may be caused by enemies one-tenth the size of the butterfly. Since Darwin sailed on the Beagle over 150 years ago, scientists have theorized that the main influence on the evolution of coloration in butterflies came from large predators such as...

2013-03-06 13:41:41

Research discovers that whether a female butterfly will mate with a male depends on the quality of his sex pheromones The mating success of male butterflies is often lower if they are inbred. But how do female butterflies know which males to avoid? New research reveals that inbred male butterflies produce significantly less sex pheromones, making them less attractive to females. The research was published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. If animals (and humans)...

Monarch Butterflies Won't Migrate North Unless They Can Chill Out First In Mexico
2013-02-22 10:09:45

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of monarch butterflies from across the eastern U.S. begin a southward migration each fall to escape the frigid temperatures of the northern boundary of their range. They travel up to 2,000 miles to reach an overwintering site in a very specific grove of fir trees in central Mexico. A new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass) suggests the butterflies require the exposure to coldness in the...

Lepidoptera Species Found In Jamaica
2012-12-04 08:13:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A study describing a new species of Lepidoptera found in Jamaica's last remaining wilderness was recently published in the journal Tropical Lepidoptera Research by a team of scientists from the University of Florida. The new species belongs to the skipper family of butterflies. This is the first new butterfly discovered in Jamaica since 1995 and scientists hope that the native butterfly will encourage conservation of the Cockpit...

Butterflies Inspire New Technology
2012-11-08 14:15:17

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Can technology benefit by going green? I´m not talking about retro-fitting buildings for solar power or setting up grey water collection systems. In the recent issue of the journal Soft Matter, a research team out of the Ohio State University is looking at organic materials to aid in the resurfacing of existing technologies and possibly for the manufacture of new products and materials. The team, comprised primarily of...

Disappearing Butterfly Mystery Solved
2012-10-21 10:19:10

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports — Your Universe Online Using radar, researchers have successfully tracked the autumn migration of the painted lady, solving once and for all the mystery of what happened to the butterfly species after it disappeared from the UK at summer's end. While some believed that the colorful species of creature simply died out when the season ended, new research published in the journal Ecography reports they actually flee the UK and head south, migrating...


Latest Butterfly Reference Libraries

0_3add5c05a285ba8152d462fb481aa2ad
2009-04-28 15:52:13

Buddaleja utahensis is more commonly known as the Utah Butterfly Bush or the Panamint Butterfly Bushand is indigenous to the southwestern United States. Growing nearly 20 inches tall, this bristly shrub features expasive branching network with a wide circumference. Its leaves give off a silvery green color resulting from the fine hairs that cover the plant. Each leaf has a bumpy texture with sides that curl under and measures approximately 1inch. Bundles of tubular soft green flowers...

40_b92cebd8cd9f9a184d4c11970cebf004
2007-12-27 10:26:59

The Rothschild's Birdwing (Ornithoptera rothschildi), is a large butterfly from the birdwing genus endemic to the Arfak Mountains, Western New Guinea. The Rothschild's Birdwing has the most restricted distribution of all birdwings. Its preferred habitat is flowering meadows in an altitude from 6500 to 8800 feet. The females can reach a wingspan up to 6 inches. The forewings are dark brown to blackish brown with creamy white to grayish spots. The hindwings rimmed with black scales and have...

40_db06ad7924a78fe45f9bc9abce14bc3f
2007-12-27 09:55:38

The Cairns Birdwing (Ornithoptera euphorion), is Australia's largest native butterfly species. Cairns Birdwings are found southwards from Mount Webb and Cooktown to Mackay in Queensland. Favored habitat is primary rainforest, although the species will breed readily in a home garden if the correct larval host plants are grown. Males have a predominately black upper wing with emerald green flashes, however the female lacks the green coloring, having a plain black upper wing with white...

40_7c45488a5958552b71928d24f823347f
2007-12-27 09:52:26

Queen Alexandra's Birdwing (Ornithoptera alexandrae), is the largest butterfly in the world. The species was named by Lord Walter Rothschild in 1907, in honor of Queen Alexandra, wife of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. The first European to discover the species was Albert Stewart Meek in 1906, a collector employed by Lord Walter Rothschild to collect natural history specimens from Papua New Guinea. Although the first specimen was taken with the aid of a small shotgun, Meek soon...

40_6555f8ff2bed52a39f78de5130f06fab
2005-09-12 10:40:35

The Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) is a common swallowtail butterfly found in western North America. Both the upper and lower sides of its wings are black, but the upper wing has a broad yellow stripe across it, which gives the butterfly an overall yellow appearance. Striking blue spots adorn the rear edge of the rear wing, and the characteristic tails of the swallowtails. Its wingspan is 7-9 cm and its body is somewhat shorter than the rather similar Western Tiger Swallowtail, with...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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