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Latest Cadherins Stories

2014-01-08 08:29:37

Adheron's lead product, Cadherin-11 inhibitor SDP051, is based on pioneering cell technology and may be used in various therapeutic indications of high unmet medical need SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Adheron Therapeutics, a biotechnology company which focuses on leveraging pioneering technology that disrupts cell adhesion to treat a variety of diseases, announced the completion of the company's Phase 1 clinical trial for its leading Cad-11 inhibitor SDP051. Cad-11...

2013-11-14 12:20:01

A molecule that helps cells stick together is significantly over-produced in two very different diseases — rheumatoid arthritis and a variety of cancers, including breast and brain tumors, concludes a new study. The scientists who made the discovery also found candidate drugs to inhibit the molecule, cadherin-11, one of which is already in a clinical trial. The study, published in Oncotarget, was led by investigators at Georgetown University Medical Center, and included collaborators...

2012-03-15 16:56:52

American Cancer Society-Funded Research Reveals Molecule Called Cadherin-23 Could Play a Role in the Earliest Stages of Breast Cancer Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Biologist Lee Ligon has found a previously unknown connection between breast cancer tumor cells and the surrounding healthy tissue. The results provide new information on the earliest stages of breast cancer metastasis. The results were published March 7, 2012, in the journal PLoS One, in a paper titled “ Cadherin-23...

2012-01-20 10:59:48

Novel imaging platform reveals new details on disease development When cancers become aggressive and spread they are the most deadly. Unfortunately, little is known about how to stop this development. A new imaging platform developed by Lawson Health Research Institute's Drs. Ann Chambers and John Lewis is providing insight into just that - the exact moment when cancer cells turn deadly. Certain proteins, such as E-cadherin, are important for the maintenance of normal tissue structure....

2011-07-15 14:33:24

A protein molecule that 'glues' cells together and so has a key role in cancer is also responsible for many other important functions of cells, a new study has found. University of Manchester scientists say their unexpected findings are important because they could lead to a better understanding of why some cancer cells are difficult to eradicate in patients and lead to new cancer treatments. The research "“ published in PLoS One today "“ looked at the role of the cell-adhesion...

2010-05-10 12:12:46

New research in the Journal of Cell Biology helps explain how the toxic protein responsible for botulism can enter circulation from the digestive system. The study appears online May 10. Botulism, a rare but serious paralytic illness, is caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), an extremely toxic protein that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. In food-borne botulism, the nontoxic components of BoNT"”including hemagglutinin (HA)"”protect the toxin from the low pH and...

2010-04-19 08:05:00

Rising from the top surface of each of the specialized receptor cells in our inner ears is a bundle of sensory cilia that responds to the movement of sound. As sensitive as they are fragile, these cilia can move to wisps of sound no larger than a molecule"”but can shear at sounds that are larger than life. Cilia function mechanically, fluttering back and forth in response to sound vibrations. The tug of the cilia creates tension in fine "tip links" that tether each cilium to its...

2010-02-16 14:03:42

The ability of tissue cells to stick to one another is critical for many physiological and pathological processes. But normal living cells need to do much more than just hold on tight, they must monitor their environment and respond with appropriate changes in shape, migration, and proliferation. Now, a new study published online on February 16th by Cell Press in the Biophysical Journal provides intriguing insight into how mechanical interaction with the external environment influences cell...

2007-12-05 13:25:30

Scientists have gotten their best look ever at interactions inside human skin cells, finding a Velcro-like setup that links them and makes skin strong while also supple. The cell-interior images, made with a new a technique called cryo-electron tomography, show the proteins responsible for cell-cell contacts for the first time. "This is a real breakthrough in two respects," said Achilleas Frangakis of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. "Never before has it been possible...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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