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Latest Caenorhabditis elegans Stories

2014-07-18 12:53:40

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Scientists identify a gene that controls the timing of precisely ordered events during maturation Closely related organisms share most of their genes, but these similarities belie major differences in behavior, intelligence, and physical appearance. For example, we share nearly 99% of our genes with chimps, our closest relatives on the great "tree of life." Still, the differences between the two species are unmistakable. If not just genes, what else...

Genes Link Diet and aging
2014-01-28 09:58:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It seems like every other commercial on TV today is another diet company, with yet another diet plan. You probably know someone who has tried everything from the Paleo Diet, to gluten-free, to the Atkins Diet. The big question is, which diet is right? A new study published in Cell Metabolism reveals they might all be right. University of Southern California scientists Sean Curran and Shanshan Pang have identified a collection of...

Top Researchers Brought Together To Sequence Genomes Of Invertebrates
2013-12-13 13:45:51

Nova Southeastern University NSU professor organized and hosted first-ever workshop with experts from across the globe Pop Quiz: what creatures make up more than 70% of the approximately 1.9 million described species on earth and have long served as model organisms in many areas of biology? If you guessed invertebrates, you're right! To begin exploring this question, a new cooperative consortium called the Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA) was formed and held its inaugural...

Researchers Discover How To Change Cell Types By Flipping A Single Switch
2013-12-04 13:05:09

University of California - Santa Barbara With few exceptions, cells don't change type once they have become specialized — a heart cell, for example, won't suddenly become a brain cell. However, new findings by researchers at UC Santa Barbara have identified a method for changing one cell type into another in a process called forced transdifferentiation. Their work appears today in the journal Development. With C. elegans as the animal model, lead author Misty Riddle, a Ph.D. student...

2013-11-29 14:35:53

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that males of the laboratory roundworm secrete signaling molecules that significantly shorten the lifespan of the opposite sex. The scientists speculate that, if carried out after reproduction, this "male-induced demise" could serve to conserve precious resources for a male's offspring or to decrease the supply of mates for other males. For several years, it's been known that the presence of some male worms and...

2013-11-14 23:21:18

Researchers develop novel method to image worm brain activity and screen early stage compounds aimed at treating autism and anxiety. Worcester, MA (PRWEB) November 14, 2013 A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and The Rockefeller University in New York has developed a novel system to image brain activity in multiple awake and unconstrained worms. The technology, which makes it possible to study the genetics and neural circuitry associated with animal behavior, can also...

2013-10-15 20:42:22

Better understanding of the movements of C. elegans worm will make a big difference in biomedical research One might wonder why researchers would even care about the nuances of the one-millimeter long nematode worm, let alone take the time to study them. But the answer is simple: they can provide powerful insights into human health and disease. New research performed at Texas Tech University and published in the journal Physics of Fluids demonstrates just that. By studying how this tiny...

2013-09-04 08:28:45

When the tiny roundworm C. elegans reaches middle age—at about 2 weeks old—it can't quite move like it did in the bloom of youth. But rather than imposing an exercise regimen to rebuild the worm's body-wall muscles, researchers can bring the wriggle back by stimulating the animal's neurons. And, they say, pharmaceuticals might have a similar effect in mammals. Scientists at the University of Michigan's Life Sciences Institute and Medical School have found that the loss of motor ability...

2013-08-15 21:02:47

Scientists question why some suffer and others are better able to cope New research at Rutgers University may help shed light on how and why nervous system changes occur and what causes some people to suffer from life-threatening anxiety disorders while others are better able to cope. Maureen Barr, a professor in the Department of Genetics, and a team of researchers, found that the architectural structure of the six sensory brain cells in the roundworm, responsible for receiving...

2013-05-09 23:04:11

A particular tumor suppressor gene that fights cancer cells does more than clamp down on unabated cell division -- the hallmark of the disease -- it also can help make cells more fit by allowing them to fend off stress, says a University of Colorado Boulder study. Boulder, CO (PRWEB) May 09, 2013 A particular tumor suppressor gene that fights cancer cells does more than clamp down on unabated cell division -- the hallmark of the disease -- it also can help make cells more fit by allowing...


Latest Caenorhabditis elegans Reference Libraries

Caenorhabditis elegans
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Caenorhabditis elegans is a species of parasitic roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in temperate regions, in many different areas of the world. It prefers to reside in nutrient rich soils. Its scientific name is derived from the Greek terms Caeno, meaning recent, rhabditis, meaning rod-like, and the Latin term elegans, which means elegant. It was first named by Maupas in 1900, but was not classified in the Caenorhabditis subgenus until 1952 by Osche. Caenorhabditis elegans...

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Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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