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Latest Caenorhabditis elegans Stories

2010-05-07 13:57:28

A breakthrough about the formation and maintenance of tree-like nerve cell structures could have future applications in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and the repair of injuries in which neurons are damaged. The findings by the international team led by Prof. Benjamin Podbilewicz of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Faculty of Biology were published in the May 6th issue of Science Express. While biologists have known for years that many neurons form complicated...

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2010-04-25 13:23:04

First mice, then fruit flies, and now knockout nematodes Knocking genes out of action allows researchers to learn what genes do by seeing what goes wrong without them. University of Utah biologists pioneered the field. Mario Capecchi won a Nobel Prize for developing knockout mice. Kent Golic found a way to cripple fruit fly genes. Now, biologist Erik Jorgensen and colleagues have devised a procedure for knocking out genes in nematode worms. "We developed a method that allows us to walk...

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2010-04-19 08:42:12

Did you ever wonder how you are able to perform complex tasks - even under stress? And how do emotions and memories mould your ability to live your everyday lives? The answer is just beginning to be understood and lies in hidden circuits in the brain. Pioneering work by Roger Pocock, a newly arrived Group Leader at the research center BRIC, University of Copenhagen, reveals the remarkable ability of organisms to activate latent neuronal circuits under stressful conditions. It is suggested...

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2010-04-02 08:42:58

Scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) at the University of Birmingham have discovered that a gene called DAF-16 is strongly involved in determining the rate of ageing and average lifespan of the laboratory worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and its close evolutionary cousins. DAF-16 is found in many other animals, including humans. It is possible that this knowledge could open up new avenues for altering ageing, immunity and resistance...

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2010-03-11 15:30:18

A research team led by the University of Colorado at Boulder has discovered a previously unknown cellular "switch" that may provide researchers with a new means of triggering programmed cell death, findings with implications for treating cancer. The new results are a big step forward in understanding programmed cell death, or apoptosis, a cell suicide process that involves a series of biochemical events leading to changes like cell body shrinkage, mitochondria destruction and chromosome...

2010-02-17 14:35:00

Biophysicists show that 'incomplete penetrance' is not just a question of nature versus nurture CAMBRIDGE, Mass. "” For years, biologists have wondered how it is possible that not every person who carries a mutated gene expresses the trait or condition associated with the mutation. This common but poorly understood phenomenon, known as incomplete penetrance, exists in a wide range of organisms, including humans. Many mutations in genes that are linked to diseases, including Parkinson's...

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2010-01-06 07:55:00

A Nobel-winning process for testing new drugs to treat diseases such as Huntington's, Parkinson's, and muscular dystrophy is getting an electrical charge. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a way to propel and direct microscopic-sized worms (C. elegans nematodes) along a narrow channel using a mild electric field. The discovery opens up significant possibilities for developing high-throughput micro-screening devices for drug discovery and other applications. "This is the first...

2009-12-17 15:18:21

All-optical technique determines when neurons inhibit or excite one another Scientists at Harvard University have used light and genetic trickery to trace out neurons' ability to excite or inhibit one another, literally shedding new light on the question of how neurons interact with one another in live animals. The work is described in the current issue of the journal Nature Methods. It builds upon scientists' understanding of the neural circuitry of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans,...

2009-12-09 19:59:31

Research in the journal Genetics identifies potential drug development target for epilepsy seizures A team of scientists from The University of Alabama used worms to reel in information that they hope will lead to a greater understanding of cellular mechanisms that may be exploited to treat epilepsy. In a new research report in the journal GENETICS (http://www.genetics.org), the researchers explain how the transparent roundworm, C. elegans, helped them identify key "molecular switches" that...

2009-10-02 09:26:06

The study of RNA has long been the tool of choice for understanding where and when genes are expressed in a cell, tissue, or organism during development or under specific physiological or environmental conditions. Recent discoveries have revolutionized our concept of RNA function; it is now known to be active in a much wider set of biological processes than was previously believed. Techniques for isolating RNA and for uncovering its interactions with proteins have taken on new importance as...


Latest Caenorhabditis elegans Reference Libraries

Caenorhabditis elegans
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Caenorhabditis elegans is a species of parasitic roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in temperate regions, in many different areas of the world. It prefers to reside in nutrient rich soils. Its scientific name is derived from the Greek terms Caeno, meaning recent, rhabditis, meaning rod-like, and the Latin term elegans, which means elegant. It was first named by Maupas in 1900, but was not classified in the Caenorhabditis subgenus until 1952 by Osche. Caenorhabditis elegans...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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