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Latest Caenorhabditis elegans Stories

2009-08-31 08:05:49

Scientific dogma has long asserted that females are born with their entire lifetime supply of eggs, and once they're gone, they're gone. New findings suggest that in nematode worms, at least, this is not necessarily so. Molecular physiologist Marc Van Gilst, Ph.D., and colleagues at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle report that during starvation, sexually mature adult worms stop ovulating and the germline component of their reproductive system "“ the sex cells, including...

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2009-08-05 10:00:00

In an advance that could help ease the antibiotic drought, scientists in Massachusetts are describing successful use of a test that enlists pinhead-sized worms in efforts to discover badly needed new antibiotics. Their study appeared in ACS Chemical Biology, a monthly journal.Frederick Ausubel and colleagues note in the new study that existing methods for identifying germ-fighting drugs involve adding the potential drug to cultures of bacteria or cells and watching the results. These tests...

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2009-07-02 14:00:00

Work with tiny worm could point to new treatments for human brain disordersAlthough the tiny roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has only 302 neurons in its entire nervous system, studies of this simple animal have significantly advanced our understanding of human brain function because it shares many genes and neurochemical signaling molecules with humans. Now MIT researchers have found novel C. elegans neurochemical receptors, the discovery of which could lead to new therapeutic targets for...

2009-06-25 09:41:21

Researchers studying the nervous control of nematode mating behavior have produced video footage of a male worm preparing to mate with a hermaphrodite. Writing in the open access journal BMC Biology, Allyson Whittaker and Paul Sternberg from the California Institute of Technology investigated the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter acetylcholine in regulating tail muscles to achieve an exploratory embrace.The video shows an intimate moment between two nematodes of the species...

2009-06-07 12:39:36

Mutations extending lifespan induce expression of germline genes in somatic cells In the sense that organisms existing today are connected through a chain of life "“ through their parents, grandparents and other ancestors "“ almost a billion years back to the first animals of the pre-Cambrian era, an animal's reproductive cells can be considered to be immortal. These germline cells generate their offspring's somatic cells "“ other cells involved in all aspects of growth,...

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2009-05-26 13:12:24

New findings by researchers UT Southwestern Medical Center are accelerating efforts to eradicate worm infections that afflict a third of the world's population. The new findings, available online and in an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrate that a biochemical system that controls development and reproduction of Caenorhabditis elegans, a common research worm, also provides the same function in several parasitic nematodes, including hookworm. In...

2009-04-17 19:51:00

SILVERTHORNE, Colo., April 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology will convene its conference on "The Biology of RNA Silencing" on April 25, 2009 at the Fairmont Empress Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia. This will be an opportunity to hear two Nobel Laureates within the speaker line-up. Andrew Fire of Stanford University will deliver a keynote address on the evening of April 25 on "Adventures in the Small RNA-ome." On Monday morning, April 27,...

2009-04-17 11:34:18

The common research worm, C. elegans, is able to use heat-sensing nerve cells to not only regulate its response to hotter environments, but also to control the pace of its aging as a result of that heat, according to new research at the University of California, San Francisco.The new findings have turned upside down a widespread assumption about how cold-blooded animals respond to and regulate heat, the researchers say. The study is reported in the online early edition of the journal "Current...

2009-04-02 16:53:39

A particular nuclear hormone receptor called DAF-12 and molecules called microRNAs in the let-7 family form a molecular switch that encourages cells in the larvae of a model worm to shift to a more developed state, said a consortium led by researchers from Baylor College of Medicine (www.bcm.edu) in a report that appears online today in the journal Science (www.sciencemag.org). As organisms go through the stages of life, hormones coordinate the changes. Nuclear receptors respond to hormones...

2009-01-15 09:12:37

New research from University of California, Davis, shows why a species of tiny worm can learn to ignore an odor "“ information that could have implications for how human memories are formed.Scientists have known for decades that sensory neurons "“ nerves in places like our fingers, ears and eyes "“ begin the complex task of processing sights, sounds and other stimuli before forwarding the job to the body's mainframe computer: the brain. But just how these neurons accomplish...


Latest Caenorhabditis elegans Reference Libraries

Caenorhabditis elegans
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Caenorhabditis elegans is a species of parasitic roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in temperate regions, in many different areas of the world. It prefers to reside in nutrient rich soils. Its scientific name is derived from the Greek terms Caeno, meaning recent, rhabditis, meaning rod-like, and the Latin term elegans, which means elegant. It was first named by Maupas in 1900, but was not classified in the Caenorhabditis subgenus until 1952 by Osche. Caenorhabditis elegans...

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