Quantcast

Latest California NanoSystems Institute Stories

2014-02-24 12:31:40

Los Alamos Nominates CNSI for Department of Energy Small Business of the Year Award GAITHERSBURG, Md., Feb. 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- CNSI today announced it has been selected by Los Alamos National Security LLC (LANS) to continue its work providing telecommunications support and related services at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANS has managed operations at the Laboratory since 2006 and CNSI was selected in 2008 to support telecommunications at the Laboratory. As part of...

Smartphone Attachment Can Detect A Single Virus And Nanoparticles
2013-09-17 12:26:10

University of California Your smartphone now can see what the naked eye cannot: A single virus and bits of material less than one-thousandth of the width of a human hair. Aydogan Ozcan, a professor of electrical engineering and bioengineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and his team have created a portable smartphone attachment that can be used to perform sophisticated field testing to detect viruses and bacteria without the need for bulky and...

2011-11-22 12:19:28

As the market for liquid crystal displays and other electronics continues to drive up the price of indium – the material used to make the indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrodes in these devices – scientists have been searching for a less costly and more dynamic alternative, particularly for use in future flexible electronics.   Besides its high price, ITO has several drawbacks. It's brittle, making it impractical for use in flexible displays and solar cells, and...

Image 1 - New Method Of Growing High-quality Graphene Promising For Next-gen Technology
2011-10-17 08:08:55

Method refined by UC Santa Barbara scientists to synthesize sheets of 'wonder material' graphene is promising link to futuristic technology Making waves as the material that will revolutionize electronics, graphene — composed of a single layer of Carbon atoms — has nonetheless been challenging to produce in a way that will be practical for innovative electronics applications. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have discovered a method to synthesize high quality graphene in a...

Image 1 - AlloSphere Offers Interactive Experience Of Nano-sized Worlds
2011-09-07 10:09:56

  New research opportunities emerge from instrument that immerses researchers in multi-dimensional information What would it be like to dive into the veins and arteries of the human body or weave through the layers of the brain? With the AlloSphere, a 33-foot diameter sphere built inside of a three-story echo-free cube, these feats are now possible. The AlloSphere is one of the largest immersive scientific instruments in the world. It takes scientific data that is too small to...

2010-11-17 22:16:32

New experimental test of buried contacts paves the way for molecular devices As electronics become smaller and smaller the need to understand nanoscale phenomena becomes greater and greater. Because materials exhibit different properties at the nanoscale than they do at larger scales, new techniques are required to understand and to exploit these new phenomena. A team of researchers led by Paul Weiss, UCLA's Fred Kavli Chair in NanoSystems Sciences, has developed a tool to study nanoscale...

0d2765b912740a17e3aeec987a7a60f9
2010-11-02 09:12:33

Conductive plastic coatings could lead to new solar cells, windows, sensors By Mike Rodewald, UCLA Oil and water don't mix, but add in some nanofibers and all bets are off. A team of UCLA chemists and engineers has developed a new method for coating large surfaces with nanofiber thin films that are both transparent and electrically conductive. Their method involves the vigorous agitation of water, dense oil and polymer nanofibers. After this solution is sufficiently agitated it spreads...

2010-09-03 18:19:56

Graphene, a one-atom-thick layer of graphitic carbon, has great potential to make electronic devices such as radios, computers and phones faster and smaller. But its unique properties have also led to difficulties in integrating the material into such devices. In a paper published Sept. 1 in the journal Nature, a group of UCLA researchers demonstrate how they have overcome some of these difficulties to fabricate the fastest graphene transistor to date. With the highest known carrier...

0e3eb0f689d5bf454af3a5fc0d8032e3
2010-09-01 20:27:15

Researchers clear hurdle on path toward gene-therapy treatment for diseaseOne of the most difficult aspects of working at the nanoscale is actually seeing the object being worked on. Biological structures like viruses, which are smaller than the wavelength of light, are invisible to standard optical microscopes and difficult to capture in their native form with other imaging techniques. A multidisciplinary research group at UCLA has now teamed up to not only visualize a virus but to use...

2010-08-10 14:34:31

New nanomaterial could improve therapeutics and imaging in cancer treatment Scientists from UCLA's California NanoSystems Institute and Korea's Yonsei University have developed an innovative method that enables nanomachines to release drugs inside living cancer cells when activated remotely by an oscillating magnetic field. The new system "” the first to utilize a class of porous nanomaterials driven by a magnetic core "” has the potential to improve both targeted...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
Related