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Latest Camera trap Stories

Image Of Eagle Attacking Deer Caught By Camera Trap
2013-09-23 10:25:32

Wildlife Conservation Society A camera trap set out for endangered Siberian (Amur) tigers in the Russian Far East photographed something far more rare: a golden eagle capturing a young sika deer. The three images only cover a two-second period, but show an adult golden eagle clinging to the deer's back. Its carcass was found two weeks later, just a few yards from the camera, initially puzzling researchers. The paper and images appear in the September issue of the Journal of Raptor...

Sumatran Tigers Threatened Human Development
2013-06-27 15:14:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from Indonesian and American researchers in The International Journal of Conservation indicates that tigers on the Indonesian island of Sumatra have been highly susceptible to human development. "Tigers are not only threatened by habitat loss from deforestation and poaching; they are also very sensitive to human disturbance," said study co-author and Virginia Tech researcher Sunarto, a native of Indonesia, where people...

Rare Persian Leopard Caught On Camera Traps
2011-12-07 13:47:03

A rare Persian leopard has been photographed in camera traps in Afghanistan's central highlands by conservationists. Biologists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) set up camera traps in the Hindu Kush region of Afghanistan. They found that the world's largest leopard, a Persian leopard, had made an encounter with the cameras. The leopard is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List, and is considered a subspecies that was thought to have vanished from the Hindu Kush. The...

WWF Cameras Catch 5 Rare Wildcats On Film
2011-11-17 13:19:05

The WWF said that its survey in the forest Bukit Tigapuluh (Thirty Hills) in Indonesia has captured five rare wild cat species on camera. The survey captured the Sumatran tiger, clouded leopard, marble cat, golden cat, and leopard cat on camera. All of the wild cats were found in an unprotected forest corridor between the Bukit Tigapuluh forest landscape and the Rimbang Baling Wildlife sanctuary in Riau Province. "Four of these species are protected by Indonesian Government...

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2011-02-28 07:51:14

Researching animals in the wild can be challenging, especially if it involves a rare or elusive species like the giant panda or the clouded leopard. To remedy this, scientists rely heavily on camera traps"”automated cameras with motion sensors. Left to photograph what passes in front of them, the cameras record the diversity and very often the behavior of animals around the world. The Smithsonian has brought together more than 202,000 wildlife photos from seven projects conducted by...

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2010-04-21 11:10:00

A World Wildlife Fund (WWF) camera trap has reportedly caught a picture of a rare Borneo rhino, according to an April 21 article by the AFP news agency. The report notes that the rhino is believed to be a pregnant female under 20 years of age. "The size (of the rhino) is quite extraordinary," WWF official Raymond Alfred told the Associated Press (AP) on Wednesday, adding that the organization believes the female is with child because of "on the shape and the size of the body and stomach." If...

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2010-01-07 08:45:00

Camera traps deep in the Sumatran jungle have captured first-time images of a rare female tiger and her cubs, giving researchers unique insight into the elusive tiger's behavior. After a month in operation, specially designed video cameras installed by WWF-Indonesia's researchers seeking to record tigers in the Sumatran jungle caught the mother tiger and her cubs on film as they stopped to sniff and check out the camera trap. There are as few as 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild and they...

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2009-03-11 13:45:05

A team of scientists has unveiled a new piece of software that is able to identify individual tigers by the unique stripe patterns on their coats, which the developers say will make it easier to estimate tiger populations and aid conservation efforts, BBC News reported. The technology can also match skins sold on the black market to photographs of the animals taken using camera traps, researchers based in the UK and India reported in the journal Biology Letters. The researchers based the...