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Latest Cancer immunotherapy Stories

2012-06-02 23:01:47

• Clinical Activity of Anti-PD-1 Published in New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and Presented at 48th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) • Phase 1 Data on Second Investigational Immunotherapy (Anti-PD-L1) Also Published in NEJM and Presented at ASCO Milwaukee, WI (PRWEB) June 02, 2012 SITC leaders publish landmark studies of new cancer immunotherapeutics Clinical activity of two cancer immunotherapeutic agents, anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 were...

2012-05-31 01:24:04

TAU researcher develops new antibodies to target and destroy cancer cells Because cancer cells grow very quickly, chemotherapy is designed to target cells whose numbers grow rapidly. But this treatment comes with a heavy price – many healthy cells essential for body functions are also targeted and killed by the toxin. This dangerous side-effect has prompted researchers to seek better and more selective ways to kill cancer cells inside the body. Prof. Daniel Wreschner of Tel Aviv...

2012-05-09 19:24:23

Rather than stimulating immune cells to more effectively battle cancerous tumors, treatment with the protein interleukin-12 (IL-12) has the opposite effect, driving these intracellular fighters to exhaustion, a Mayo Clinic study has found. The findings appear in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The study helps explain the negative results of clinical trials testing the treatment's ability to ramp up the body's natural immune response to destroy cancer cells. The study also demonstrates...

2012-04-02 15:28:44

Fox Chase scientists suggest that the findings could also serve as a new target for treatment Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia have found that a protein associated with other cancers appears to also be important in head and neck cancer, and may consequently serve as a good target for new treatments. The findings will be reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012 on Sunday, April 1. The researchers found that patients whose tumors had higher levels of the protein...

2012-03-27 08:38:49

Human tumors transplanted into laboratory mice disappeared or shrank when scientists treated the animals with a single antibody, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The antibody works by masking a protein flag on cancer cells that protects them from macrophages and other cells in the immune system. The scientists achieved the findings with human breast, ovarian, colon, bladder, brain, liver and prostate cancer samples. It is the first antibody...

2012-03-19 10:12:38

The utility of a naturally occurring protein given, sometimes to great effect, as a drug to treat advanced cancers is limited by the severe side effects it sometimes causes. But a Stanford University School of Medicine scientist has generated a mutant version of the protein whose modified shape renders it substantially more potent than the natural protein while reducing its toxicity. The protein, known as interleukin-2 or IL-2, is a master regulator of the immune system. It acts as a...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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